Accumulating capital. Strategies of profit and dispossessive policies

Call for papers

International colloquium

Thursday 6 June 2019 – Friday 7 June 2019

University of Paris Dauphine (Central Paris)

 

IRISSO, Université Paris Dauphine

Centre Emile Durkheim / Sciences po Bordeaux

Groupe de projet « Structures politiques du capitalisme » [SPoC]

Institute for Research and Innovation in Society

Labex Science, Innovation and Technology in Society

Maison des sciences de l’Homme Paris Nord

 

Keynote speakers:

Gérard Duménil

Nancy Fraser

David Harvey

Frédéric Lordon

Jason Moore

Ozlem Onaran

Thomas Piketty

With the help of the students of the “Institutions, Organisations, Economy and Society” master’s programme (PSL, EHESS/Paris Dauphine/Mines ParisTech) (Eve Chiapello, Paul Lagneau-Ymonet)

Call for proposals

The extreme magnitude of the pressures exerted by contemporary capitalism on the environment and populations could suggest that this mode of production has reached its limits. The depletion of natural resources, global warming and the increase in inequality within Western countries seem to threaten the minimum degree of social and political stability required for the extraction of profit. However, the accumulation of capital is not slowing: traditional sources of profit transform themselves and new ones emerge, taking advantage of these environmental and social disruptions in order to supply new centres of accumulation with capital.

This international colloquium aims to highlight the economic and political mechanisms that explain the contemporary reconfiguration of the capital dispossession and accumulation centres. Following the works of David Harvey, David Graeber and Thomas Piketty, the question of the social fabric of capitalist accumulation has become a central issue in the  contemporary debates in social sciences. This colloquium will highlight the new generation of works that cut across disciplinary boundaries to reflect on the political dimensions of contemporary profit strategies and the institutions that support the neoliberal policies of dispossession. In doing so, it will report on the institutional substructure of the new forms of capital extraction and accumulation.

The colloquium focuses on the concept of capital accumulation, as both an economic and institutional process. Accumulation is based on processes of valorisation that progressively enable an increase in the value circulating in the economy. Accumulation is the central feature that singularises capitalism as an economic system. The various forms of exploitation, innovation and capital circulation contribute to the broader accumulation process as part ofinstitutionally regulated social relationships and this fuels wealth concentration. Therefore, centres of accumulation are strongly tied to centres of dispossession and institutions that enable their development by defining the political rules of the circulation, distribution and accumulation of capital.

This reflection is part of a renewed interest by the social sciences in the topic of capital accumulation, stimulated by the economic, financial and ecological crises and the unprecedented increase in inequalities in terms of access to resources. The colloquium is intended to investigate a potential renewal of the sources and institutions of capital accumulation by focusing in particular on the evolution and the extension of contemporary forms of profit extraction from labour, finance, nature and technological innovations. It aims to map and describe the internal organisation of these centres of capital accumulation, to track their institutional and economic genesis, and to determine how they are articulated to each other. Through a description of these new sources of profit, the colloquium will highlight the inseparably economic and political logics of the accumulation of capital within contemporary capitalism, ranging from the historical logic of profit through the appropriation of surplus value, to the contemporary logic of profit through speculation and dispossession.

The colloquium will gather contributions relating to five important topics:

1) Accumulation and exploitation

Since the 19th century, labour has been the most visible source of surplus and profit creation. However, forms of exploitation have evolved in post-Fordist capitalism. This axis investigates how the globalisation of supply chains, outsourcing, and shifts in the legal status of labour have contributed to the renewal and extension of industrial accumulation centres. The processes of profit extraction from labour have been highly affected by the emergence of platform capitalism and, to a broader extent, of firms that aim to coordinate production activities disseminated through space and organisations instead of producing on their own. What are the new networks of capital circulation that bind workers from very diverse geographical and legal backgrounds with industrial centres of profit accumulation? What are the institutional mechanisms that enable and encourage these new ways of producing and accumulating capital?

2) Accumulation and finance

Since the 1980s, financialisation has resulted in an increase in the volume of financial flows and the emergence of vast financial centres of capital accumulation. The financial sector has become crucial to explaining contemporary inequalities and wealth accumulation. What are the institutional mechanisms involved in the circulation and accumulation of financial capital? Furthermore, since the 1980s, the growth of financial profit has been almost constant (barely interrupted by financial crises), suggesting an increase in the autonomy of financial profit regarding to the productive sphere. This axis investigates the potential process of decoupling finance and the productive world: how do dispossession and speculative movements support the financial accumulation of capital? Reciprocally, how does the financialisation process affect the strategies of profit based on labour exploitation?

3) Accumulation and natural resources

The capitalist use of natural resources appears to be both a source of profit and an obstacle to the perpetuation of capitalism. The deterioration of the environment and the depletion of non- renewable resources signals a second contradiction of capitalism, opposing profit production to the reproduction of the very condition for profit. How can capitalism remedy this self- destructing process by stopping to consider environmental issues as mere “externalities” and integrating them with the profit-generating mechanisms? Does the resolution of this contradiction involve an end of capitalism itself? This axis also aims to study the status of natural spaces that have not yet been integrated into capitalist production and that represent biodiversity reservoirs, by investigating the relationship between capital accumulation and natural resources in a new light: does capitalism destroy nature by exploiting it, or does it construct nature in order to exploit it?

4) Accumulation and new technologies

Digital technologies enable new economic sectors of production and consumption to emerge based on new strategies of capital accumulation. However, their impact goes beyond the emergence of new sectors; they also contribute to transforming the surplus appropriation mechanisms in traditional productive activities. Indeed, the fragmentation of productive processes resulting from powerful information systems generates a new process of profit concentration in some nodes of the chains of value: one the one hand, the tightening of intellectual property laws produces new informational rent; on the other hand, returns to scale on intangibles and network externalities on platforms create natural monopoly situations. These movements combine and encourage value capture at the expense of productive forces. What is the impact of these socio-technical devices on the labour processes, the investment decisions and the relationship between companies and public institutions? How do these movements affect the relationship between productive forces, forms of property and relations of production?

5) Accumulation, wealth management and wealth inequalities

As it is accumulated by social actors, capital becomes a private estate that can grow through different means (namely real estate and financial investments) and be transmitted to relatives through transfers and inheritance. From this perspective, the colloquium will gather contributions studying the political and legal framing of accumulation by private individuals (property laws, taxation laws), the wealth labour undertaken by wealth management professionals serving the interests of capital holders, and the wealth inequalities that result from this.

 

Nature of the colloquium

This academic event is aimed at an international audience and field of investigation. It is a fully interdisciplinary colloquium, mobilising economic sociology, science studies, economics, political sciences, anthropology, economic history, international political economy and critical geography in order to improve our understanding of capital accumulation. This colloquium is located at the crossroads of broad reflections on capitalism and empirical investigations on its contemporary developments; as such, we welcome papers that articulate a concrete empirical field (related to one of the five above axes) with a theoretical reflection on the contemporary logics of capitalism.

Proposals

Early career researchers are strongly encouraged to submit their papers. Proposals will take the form of abstracts (500 to 900 words) written in English or French, including the title of the paper, the name and affiliation of the author, the bibliography of the abstract and the abstract itself. Abstracts should clearly emphasise both the empirical field of the paper and the theoretical reflection that it develops regarding the contemporary logics of capitalism. Proposals should be sent to the following email addresses before 1 March 2019: accumulatingcapital@gmail.com.

Authors will be notified of the decision of the scientific committee regarding their proposals by April 2019. In the case of acceptance, full papers (5,000 to 7,000 words, in English) will have to be sent to the committee by 31 May 2019. These papers will circulate among the participants of the colloquium. The colloquium will take place at the university of Paris Dauphine (central Paris) on Thursday 6 June 2019 and Friday 7 June 2019. Talks will be given in English. Selected papers from the colloquium will later be published in the form of an edited volume.

With the support of the IRISSO centre, the University of Paris Dauphine, the House of Public Affairs of the University of Paris Dauphine, the Ethics and Corporate Government chair of the Paris Dauphine Foundation, the IFRIS research institution, the SPoC project, the Emile Durkheim centre, the MSH-Paris Nord research institution.

 

Les structures politiques de l’accumulation : espaces et supports

Journée d’études du groupe SPoC

Sciences Po Toulouse  – Salle du Conseil

20 décembre 2018

Cette journée d’étude du groupe de projet « Structures politiques du capitalisme » opère une plongée empirique dans la production des luttes symboliques qui soutiennent les dynamiques d’accumulation du capital économique. Les communications prennent pour objet la production des règles qui, dans des segments délimités dans le temps et dans l’espace, organisent les rapports entre les forces économiques : si celles-ci rendent possibles les transactions, elles favorisent aussi certaines forces aux dépens d’autres,assurant une distribution spécifique du profit et du capital. En dépit de la diversité des cas d’étude, l’État – le droit précisément – constitue toujours le point focal des luttes. L’observation se porte alors vers les tissus de relations qui soutiennent la production des règles (notamment le droit) économiques. Les communications, qui appréhendent des cas d’étude diversement situés dans le temps et l’espace, pointent l’importance des investissements identitaires. Luttes économiques et représentations politiques tendent à se confondre. La sociologie des formes d’accumulation du capital économique qu’esquissent les communications ouvrent donc sur une sociologie des modes de domination, à la fois économique et symbolique.

Programme

14h-14h45 Mohammed HACHEMAOUI (Sciences Po Paris, PSIA)

« Si l’argent parle, que dit-il? Pouvoir et capital dans le crony capitalism »

14h45-15h30  Benjamin GOURISSE (Sciences Po Toulouse, LaSSP)

« L’accumulation économique dans la Turquie du parti unique(1923-1946) à la croisée des capitaux identitaires et sociaux »

15h45-16h30  Simon BITTMANN (Sciences Po Paris, CSO)

 « Le marché comme modalité d’intervention politique, un phénomène récent ? De la lutte contre les usuriers à la segmentation du crédit aux États-Unis (1903-1941) »

16h30-17h15  Fabien FOUREAULT (Sciences Po Paris, CSO)

« Un nouveau champ d’accumulation du capital : le champ des fonds d’investissement en France (1984-2007) »

17h15-18h  Valérie LARROSA (Sciences Po Toulouse, LaSSP) 

« Usages capitalistiques du droit: le cas de LVMH »

Discutants :

Matthieu ANSALONI (Sciences Po Toulouse, LaSSP / INRA-Agir)

Benjamin GOURISSE (Sciences Po Toulouse, LaSSP)

Antoine ROGER (Sciences Po Bordeaux, CED)

Doctoriales – Economie & Sociologie

Sciences Po Grenoble – 16 octobre 2018

 

Association française de sociologie,

Association française d’économie politique

Groupe de projet « Structures politiques du capitalisme » [SPoC]

Association française de science politique

Revue française de socio-économie

Sciences Po Grenoble, UMR Pacte

 

Les Doctoriales « Économie & Sociologie » visent à contribuer à l’avancement des travaux de doctorant.e.s et de jeunes docteur.e.s qui travaillent, dans une perspective de sciences sociales, sur des objets économiques : entreprises, consommation, marchés, innovations, services publics, politiques économiques, monnaies, finance, dettes publiques et privées, accumulation du capital économique… Ce faisant, les Doctoriales se veulent une vitrine du renouvellement de la recherche en sociologie économique, en science politique de l’économie et en économie institutionnaliste, ainsi que de la fécondité réciproque de ces différentes approches des faits économiques.

 

Programme

11h-13h – Session 1A (salle Domenach) : Gouvernement des conduites

Nassima Abdelghafour (CSI, Mines Paris Tech) Fabriquer des mondes- {prix}. Expérimentation et mise
 en scène des raisonnements microéconomiques

Alexis Aulanier (CSO, Sciences Po Paris) Des effets de l’usage politique des dynamiques marchandes – Le cas de l’instrumentalisation d’une relation de prescription sur le marché des pro- duits phytosanitaires

François Balaye (Pacte, U. Greno- ble) Territoires et gestionnaires de réseaux de distribution électrique : une approche critique par la proximité, la coordination et la mise en politique

Hugo Jeanningros (GEMASS, U. Paris-IV), Mesures de soi et valeurs de l’engagement. Le cas de l’évaluation et de la valorisation des comportements dans le cadre du programme de prévention santé d’une compagnie d’assurance

 

11h-13h – Session 1B (salle 31) : Trajectoires et circuits de commerce

Imane El Fakkaoui (Edsis, U. Hassan II), Migrantes subsahariennes : Entre activité commerciale et intégration sociale. « Cas des espaces commerciaux à Casablanca »

Véronique Lucas (INRA, U. Montpelli- er), Une interdépendance accrue entre agriculteurs en Cuma pour devenir plus autonomes vis-à-vis des marchés

Elisabeth Saint-Guily (CLERSÉ, Lille), Trajectoires socio-économiques d’agriculteurs en Nord-Pas de Calais : Comment font-ils pour rebondir face aux chocs ?

Edna Gyrelle Tsoungui Moukala (GRESCO, U. Poitiers), De l’encastrement social de l’économie au sein de l’activité commerciale domestique informelle au Gabon

 

14h15-16h15 – Session 2A (salle Domenach) : Socio-histoire du capitalisme

Quentin Belot (IDHES, ENS Paris-Saclay), Une proto-financiarisation fordiste. Analyse des formes organisationnelles et des dispositifs de gestion financière d’un grand groupe automobile des années 1950 aux années 1980

Julia Chardavoine (IRISSO, U. Dau- phine), Élites économiques et État au Mexique

Jean-Baptiste Devaux (Triangle, Sciences Po Lyon), Gouverner par l’innovation. L’émergence d’une nouvelle politique économique en France (1965-1981)

Hinda Mouloudj-Limane (ENSSP, Ben Aknoun), L’industrialisation en Algérie à l’épreuve de la rente pétrolière

 

14h15-16h15 – Session 2B (salle 31) : Résistances au capitalisme

François Bonnaz (Pacte, U. Greno- ble), Mettre le sort des multinationales entre les mains du peuple

Guillaume Compain (IRISSO, U. Dau- phine), Plateformes coopératives : expérimenter la coopération économique dans des organisations ouvertes

Olivier Leproux (IDHES, U. Nanterre), L’invisibilisation de l’emploi à la marge des politiques éducatives

Wiame Idrissi Alami (Pacte, U. Grenoble), La gouvernance et le financement de l’enseignement supérieur public au Maroc : Contro- verse autour de la fin de la gratuité dans l’Université publique

 

16h30-18h30 – Session 3A (salle Domenach) : Risques et innovation

Marion Flécher (IRISSO, U. Dauphine), La création de start-up, entre rêves de réussite et réalités de l’échec.

Clara Jolly (CIRAD, Inra), Les agents des sciences et technologies agricoles, professionnels du marché ?

Victor Potier (CERTOP, U. Toulouse Jean Jaurès), La stabilisation des agencements marchands publics : qualifier la valeur du jeu sérieux

Pierre Wokuri (ARÈNES, U. Rennes-1), La fabrique de compromis sociotechniques par les projets coopératifs d’énergie renouvelable en France et au Royaume-Uni : un préalable suffisant pour participer à l’ordre marchand ?

 

16h30-18h30 – Session 3B (salle 31) : Construction sociale du marché

Huana Carvalho (ENTPE, U. Lyon), Logement locatif intermédiaire : la construction d’un nouveau modèle économique pour la production, l’acquisition et la gestion du logement

Marine Duros (CMH, EHESS), «Un immeuble ne vaut que ce qu’il rapporte». Etude de la fabrique de la valeur par un cabinet en immobilier d’entreprise

Sarah Thiriot (Pacte, U. Grenoble), « Faire investir » dans la rénovation de bureaux durables : la construction de logiques économiques en matière environnementale par les acteurs du marché

Timothée Verley (CLERSÉ, Lille), Structure d’un marché de l’art : l’espace des galeries commercialisant de l’art brut en France

 

Accumulation et politique : approches et concepts

Appel à contributions

Revue de la Régulation. Capitalisme, Institutions, Pouvoir

Dossier thématique :

Accumulation et politique : approches et concepts

Coordination : Ansaloni M., Montalban M., Roger A., Smith A.

 

Le capitalisme est un mode de production dominé par un régime de propriété privée, le rapport monétaire, le rapport salarial et la logique d’accumulation du capital. Dans les écrits classiques, l’accumulation s’analyse comme le fruit d’une extorsion de la plus-value et une reproduction élargie du capital (Marx, 2006 [1867]) ou comme le fruit d’un règlement des conduites et une organisation méthodique du processus productif (Weber, 2008 [1905], 2014 [1921]). Dans un cas comme dans l’autre, l’accent est mis sur la quête incessante du profit : celle-ci est permise par une structuration politique – un pouvoir inégalement distribué permettant de délimiter les questions et les problèmes légitimes – qui appellent à une prise en charge par des politiques publiques. Les rapports de force ne viennent pas seulement étayer ou guider la quête incessante du profit : ils les instituent et les structurent intégralement (Palermo, 2007).

La séparation formelle (non pas substantielle) des ordres politique et économique conditionne l’accumulation : le capitalisme se développe précisément dans la mesure où il est perçu comme le produit de logiques économiques autonomes, plus ou moins soutenues ou encadrées par des mesures politiques qui seraient extérieures (Wood, 1981). La question centrale est alors de mettre au jour, dans des situations historiques particulières, les rapports de force qui contribuent à imposer ce principe de vision et de division. Il s’agit donc de caractériser un processus – éminemment politique – de dépolitisation de l’économie.

Le présent appel vise à susciter un débat large sur les approches (donc les concepts et les méthodes) susceptibles de saisir l’accumulation du capital comme le fruit de rapports de force politiques, ainsi que sur la capacité d’explication des processus observés par ces approches. Les propositions pourront questionner les lectures existantes de l’accumulation (la théorie de la régulation par exemple) en évaluant la possibilité d’y introduire une analyse systématique des rapports de force politiques constitutifs du capitalisme. D’autres pourront proposer des lectures alternatives de l’accumulation à partir d’un réexamen de concepts de sciences sociales, qu’il s’agisse de l’appareillage de la sociologie économique, de celui de la sociologie politique (incluant la sociologie de l’action publique) ou bien de la théorie des champs (inter alia). Des propositions tournées vers les dynamiques sectorielles seront les bienvenues, comme d’autres visant à questionner les frontières nationales comme espace pertinent de l’analyse de l’accumulation pour favoriser la prise en compte de jeux d’échelles. Les propositions devront afficher une visée théorique et leur capacité à rendre compte dans le même temps de données empiriques sera valorisée.

Les contributions pourront, entre autres, couvrir les questions suivantes :

  • Quelles sont les forces qui produisent la division et la redéfinition des frontières entre ordre politique et ordre économique ? En quoi cette division et sa forme produisent-elles des régimes économiques de l’ordre politique spécifiques ou des régimes politiques de l’ordre économique ?
  • En quoi les formes de l’accumulation capitaliste sont-elles déterminées par et déterminent-elles les structures politiques ? La financiarisation du capital induit-elle ou est-elle conditionnée à une certaine forme de régime politique ?
  • En quoi la transnationalisation de l’accumulation du capital conditionne-t-il les transformations politiques et les formes de l’Etat et des territoires ? En quoi l’accumulation par les firmes transnationales et dans les chaînes globales de valeur ou les formes sectorisées de l’accumulation sont-elles co-déterminées par et avec les régimes politiques ? En quoi une dynamique d’accumulation sectorielle ou régionale différenciée est-elle de nature à façonner des formes d’organisation politique ou étatique et réciproquement, en quoi le processus politique favorise-t-il l’accumulation de certains secteurs ou sur certains territoires vis-à-vis d’autres? En quoi les approches actuelles permettent-elles de rendre compte ou de dépasser les problématiques en termes de capture réglementaire par les grandes firmes? En quoi les formes d’accumulation dans l’entreprise ou dans certains secteurs s’articulent avec des formes du rapport salarial et de contrôle/d’exploitation du travail, engendrant des conflits et médiations politiques, et inversement, en quoi les formes de médiation politique incitent-elles à développer certaines formes d’accumulation et de subordination du travail ?
  • Quels sont les apports et les limites de la théorie de la régulation dans l’intégration des dynamiques politiques et d’accumulation du capital ? En quoi les apports des théories des champs (Bourdieu, 2000 ; Fligstein, 2001), marxistes ou autres peuvent-ils y être intégrés de façon complémentaire ?
  • En quoi le capital peut-il être appréhendé comme un pouvoir et en quoi ce pouvoir se distingue-t-il et s’articule-t-il au pouvoir politique et au pouvoir symbolique ?

Il nous paraît pertinent de lancer un appel sur cette thématique de l’accumulation et la/le politique dans un contexte où les formes d’accumulation du capital se transforment et où un renouvellement sur la dialectique entre ces thématiques et entre les sciences diverses sciences sociales (économie politique, science politique et sociologie) apparaîtrait salutaire.

L’accumulation comme point aveugle des travaux en sociologie économique et science politique

Les sociologues et politistes n’ont guère recouru au concept d’accumulation dans leurs travaux. Tentant d’apporter des réponses aux questions posées par l’économie néo-classique, les sociologues de l’économie tendent à se concentrer sur l’appariement de l’offre et de la demande et la formation des prix (e.g. Callon, 2017 ; Callon, Latour, 2017), la coordination des choix individuels en situation d’incertitude (e.g. Nee, Swedberg, 2007) ou encore la stabilisation des échanges marchands (e.g. Fligstein, 1996, 2001). D’autres mettent l’accent sur la formation des valeurs, déterminée au terme d’ajustements et en appui sur des « formes conventionnelles » (Boltanski, Esquerre, 2017). Les politistes laissent eux aussi dans l’ombre la question de l’accumulation. Le courant des « variétés du capitalisme » distingue des configurations nationales : la coopération entre les firmes amène à une situation d’équilibre que scellent des institutions présentant une certaine complémentarité (e.g. Hall, Soskice, 2001 ; Hancké, Rhodes et Thatcher, 2007 ; Jackson et Deeg, 2012).

 

 

De l’accumulation au cœur de l’économie politique critique au besoin croissant d’intégration explicite de l’ordre politique

En quête d’une parade à l’économie néo-classique, des économistes hétérodoxes ont placé au cœur de leur analyse la question de l’accumulation. Les principales analyses postkeynésiennes ont avant tout visé à formaliser les modèles de croissance et leur (in)stabilité, en étendant les principes de la demande effective à long terme ; l’analyse des processus politiques sous-jacents n’était pas leur objet premier (Robinson, 1972 [1956], Kaldor, 1961). Les contributions importantes de Kalecki (1943) et Minsky (1986) doivent cependant être signalées : l’une vise à montrer que les classes dominantes peuvent avoir un intérêt à maintenir le sous-emploi et s’opposer par conséquent à des réformes qui assureraient le plein-emploi et la croissance ; l’autre amène à considérer que les cycles financiers façonnent en partie les attitudes favorables ou non à la dérégulation financière.

Les thèses marxistes issues des travaux sur l’impérialisme par ailleurs ont tenté d’analyser les rapports de force politiques entre États comme conséquences des processus d’accumulation (Luxemburg, 1967 [1913]). Pour Wallerstein (1974), l’appropriation de la plus-value s’opère ainsi au bénéfice de quelques États et au détriment d’autres, périphériques, qui leur offrent une main-d’œuvre à bas coût et de nouveaux marchés de consommation. Des prolongements peuvent être cherchés dans la mise en évidence de processus d’« accumulation dépendante » (Frank et Amin, 1978) ou d’« accumulation par dépossession » (Harvey, 2010 [2003]). Mais ces travaux ne rendent compte des processus politiques que de manière assez distante ; ils n’insistent guère sur les structures politiques sous-jacentes à l’accumulation ni sur la relative autonomie du politique. Les travaux de Poulantzas (2013 [1976]) ont en revanche pu rendre compte de façon assez précise des processus de structuration de l’Etat comme terrain d’activité stratégique distinct mais connecté au capital ; mais ils n’ont pas permis d’étudier finement les formes prises par l’accumulation. On perçoit qu’un dialogue entre ces deux types de littératures et de problématiques (accumulation et politique) pourrait être fructueux. La théorie de la régulation a suscité des avancées qui appellent des approfondissements.

L’intégration du politique et de l’accumulation

Une première vague de travaux issus de la théorie de la régulation articule une dynamique d’accumulation proprement économique et des mesures politiques externes qui la soutiennent (Aglietta, 1997 [1976] ; Boyer et Mistral, 1979 ; Labrousse et Michel, 2016). Dans cette optique, l’activité marchande est plus ou moins encastrée dans des institutions politiques ; des forces politiques peuvent compenser les effets des forces économiques en imposant des règles de solidarité (Boyer et Hollingsworth, 1997 : 435-7 ; Boyer, 2015). Une même orientation peut être relevée chez les auteurs qui se concentrent sur les structures sociales de l’accumulation et qui postulent une canalisation des cycles de croissance par des « ordres institutionnels » politiquement négociés (Gordon et val, 1996 ; Kotz, 1994).

Dans un registre voisin, Bob Jessop caractérisait des structures économiques autonomes. Selon lui, des alliances politiques sont par ailleurs nouées entre des fractions de classe. Des « stratégies d’accumulation » sont alors développées pour donner une forme et une cohérence à l’ensemble. Celle qui est relayée par l’appareil administratif de l’Etat devient un « mode de régulation ». Les articulations observées entre forces économiques et politiques sont contingentes. Mais les premières produisent malgré tout un effet de « sélectivité stratégique » (Jessop, 1982 ; 1991).

Pour une seconde vague de travaux régulationnistes, l’étude des processus de régulation politique est devenue beaucoup plus centrale à l’analyse des transformations du mode de régulation capitaliste. L’approche topologique de Bruno Théret (1992 et 1999) met ainsi en rapport l’ordre économique et ordre politique et propose une analyse des régimes économiques de l’ordre politique ; elle peut être appliquée à l’étude de l’interaction – vertueuse ou non – entre régime politique et accumulation du capital (cf. par exemple : Marques-Pereira et Théret, 2001-2).

Wolfgang Streeck (2014) s’attache pour sa part à pointer le démantèlement du « capitalisme démocratique » formé dans l’après-guerre : il met en évidence une forme spécifique d’accumulation lorsque, dans les années 1970, une « révolte du capital » amène à abaisser le niveau de contreparties fiscales qu’assumaient jusqu’alors les détenteurs de capitaux. La prise en compte des classes sociales, des compromis socio-politiques et des logiques d’hégémonie caractérise aussi les travaux récents de Bruno Amable et de Stefano Palombarini (2017 ; Amable, 2017), qui en cela se distinguent de ceux de Hall et Soskice (2001). Selon eux, les transformations du capitalisme français plongent leurs racines dans l’effritement du « bloc social » dominant et dans une redéfinition des alliances politiques. Une autonomie est reconnue au politique et l’approche permet de rendre compte des processus politiques amenant aux modifications des institutions des modèles de capitalisme, sans toutefois s’intéresser au premier plan aux dynamiques et formes d’accumulation du capital.

Jonathan Nizan et Shimshon Bichler (2009) abordent quant à eux la question de façon originale, en appréhendant le capital comme un pouvoir. Selon eux, l’accent doit être placé sur les pratiques de « sabotage » (au sens défini par Veblen), autrement dit sur la propension des firmes à contenir leur expansion pour éviter une surproduction qui ferait obstacle à l’accumulation, plutôt que sur les rapports de force capital/travail (Nitzan, Bichler, 2009). C’est la primauté de l’« accumulation différentielle » : dans un système capitaliste, l’accumulation ne serait pas une fin en soi ; l’objectif est d’accumuler plus que les autres pour échapper à leur emprise (Nitzan, 1998). Toute activité économique repose alors sur l’exercice d’un « pouvoir » et engage des considérations politiques (Nitzan, Bichler, 2000). Ces propositions suscitent un certain nombre de questionnements sur la place spécifique du politique par rapport au capital et à l’accumulation (Knafo et al., 2013).

Procédure de soumission

L’article définitif devra être envoyé avant le 30 novembre 2018 aux adresses suivantes :

Les articles peuvent être rédigés en français ou en anglais. Les instructions aux auteurs pour les articles scientifiques quant aux normes éditoriales de la Revue de la Régulation peuvent être trouvées ici

Les articles sélectionnés seront évalués selon la procédure classique d’envoi à des rapporteurs anonymes.

 

Références

AGLIETTA Michel [1997 (1976)], Régulation et crises du capitalisme. L’expérience des Etats-Unis, Paris, Odile Jacob

AMABLE Bruno (2017), Structural crisis and institutional change in modern capitalism. French capitalism in transition, Oxford, Oxford University Press

AMABLE Bruno, Stefano PALOMBARINI (2017), L’Illusion du bloc bourgeois. Alliances sociales et avenir du modèle français, Paris, Raisons d’agir

BARAN Paul, SWEEZY Paul (1970 [1966]), Le Capitalisme monopoliste: un essai sur la société industrielle américaine, Paris, Maspero

BOLTANSKI Boltanski, CHIAPELLO Eve (1999), Le nouvel esprit du capitalisme, Paris, Gallimard

BOLTANSKI Luc, ESQUERRE Arnaud (2014), « La ‘collection’, une forme neuve du capitalisme. La mise en valeur économique du passé et ses effets »,  Les Temps Modernes, n°679, p. 5-72

BOLTANSKI, Luc et ESQUERRE (2017), Arnaud. Enrichissement. Une critique de la marchandise, Paris, Gallimard

BOURDIEU Pierre (2000), Les structures sociales de l’économie, Paris, Liber.

BOYER Robert (2007), “Capitalism strikes back. Why and what consequences for social sciences?”, Revue de la régulation, n° 1

BOYER Robert (2015), Economie politique des capitalismes. Théorie de la regulation et des crises, Paris, La découverte

BOYER Robert (1986), Théorie de la régulation. Une analyse critique, Paris, La Découverte

FLIGSTEIN Neil (1996), “Markets as politics: a political-cultural approach to market institutions”, American sociological review, 61 (4), p. 656-673

FLIGSTEIN Neil (2001), The Architecture of Markets. An Economic Sociology of Twenty-First-Century Capitalist Societies, Princeton, Princeton University Press

FLIGSTEIN Neil, McADAM Doug (2012), A Theory of Fields, Oxford, Oxford University Press

FRANK André Gunder, AMIN Samir (1978), L’accumulation dépendante, Paris, Anthropos

FRIEDMAN Milton 2009 (1962), Capitalism and freedom, Chicago, University of Chicago Press

GANE Nicholas (2012), Max Weber and contemporary capitalism, Dordrecht, Springer

GORDON David, WEISSKOPF Thomas E., BOWLES Samuel (1996) “Power, Accumulation and Crisis: The Rise and Demise of the Postwar Social Structure of Accumulation,” in LIPPIT Victor D. (ed.), Radical Political Economy: Explorations in Alternative Economic Analysis, Armonk, M.E. Sharpe, p. 226-244

HALL Peter A., SOSKICE David (eds.) (2001), “An Introduction to Varieties of Capitalism”, in HALL Peter, SOSKICE David (ed.), Varieties of capitalism: The institutional foundations of comparative advantage, Oxford, Oxford University Press, 2001, p. 1-71

HALL Peter, THELEN Kathleen (2009), “Institutional change in varieties of capitalism”, Socio-Economic Review, 7(1), p. 7-34

HANCKE Bob, RHODES Martin, THATCHER Mark (eds.) (2007), Beyond Varieties of Capitalism: Conflict, Contradictions, and Complementarities in the European Economy, Oxford, Oxford University Press

HARDT Michael, NEGRI Antonio (2004), Multitude, Paris, La découverte

HARVEY David (2010[2003]), Le nouvel impérialisme, Paris, Les prairies ordinaires

HOLLINGSWORTH J. Rogers, BOYER Robert (1997), Contemporary capitalism: The embeddedness of institutions. Cambridge, Cambridge University Press

JACKSON Gregory, DEEG Richard (2012), “The long-term trajectories of institutional change in European capitalism”, Journal of European public policy, 19(8), p. 1109-1125

JESSOP Bob (1982) The capitalist state. New York, New York University Press

JESSOP Bob (1991), “Accumulation strategies, state forms and hegemonic projects”, in CLARKE, Simon (ed.), The State Debate, Londres, Palgrave Macmillan, p. 157-182

KALDOR Nicholas (1961), “Capital accumulation and economic growth”, in LUTZ Friedrich, HAGUE Douglas (eds.), The Theory of Capital, Londres, Macmillan, p. 177-222

KALECKI Michal (1943), ”Political Aspects of Full Employment”, Political Quaterly, vol. 14, n°4, p.322-330.

KOTZ David (1994), “Interpreting the Social Structure of Accumulation Theory”, in KOTZ David, McDONOUGH Terrence, REICH Michael (eds.), Social Structures of Accumulation: The Political Economy of Growth and Crisis, Cambridge, Cambridge University Press, p. 50-71.

KNAFO Samuel, HUGHES Matthieu, WYN-JONES Steffan (2013), “Differential accumulation and the political economy of power”, in DI MUZIO, Tim (ed.). The Capitalist Mode of Power: Critical Engagements with the Power Theory of Value, Londres, Routledge, p. 134-151

LABROUSSE Agnès et MICHEL Sandrine (2016), “Accumulation regimes”, in JO T-H, L. CHESTER, C. D’IPPOLOTI (eds) : Handbook of Heterodox Political Economy, London, Routledge, 15 p.

LAPAVITSAS Costas (2009), “Financialised capitalism: Crisis and financial expropriation”, Historical Materialism, 17(2), p. 114-148

LORDON F. (1999), « Croyances économiques et pouvoir symbolique », L’Année de la régulation, 3, p. 169-207.

LUXEMBURG Rosa (1967 [1913]), L’Accumulation du capital (Tome 2), Paris, Maspero

MARQUES-PEREIRA J. et THERET B. (2001-2) « Régime politique, médiations sociales de la régulation et dynamiques macroéconomiques », L’Année de la Régulation, n°5, p. 105-143.

MARX Karl (2006 [1867]), Le Capital (Livre 1), Paris, PUF

MINSKY H. (1986), Stabilizing an unstable economy, New Haven, Yale University Press.

NEE Victor, SWEDBERG Richard (2007), On Capitalism, Stanford, Stanford University Press

NITZAN Jonathan (1998), “Differential Accumulation : towards a new political economy of capital”, Review of International Political Economy, 5(2), p. 169-216.

NITZAN Jonathan, BICHLER Shimshon (2000), “Capital Accumulation: Breaking the Dualism of ‘Economics’ and ‘Politics’”, in PALAN Ronen (ed.), Global Political Economy: Contemporary Theories, New York, Routledge, p. 67-88

NITZAN Jonathan, BICHLER Shimshon (2009), Capital as power: A study of order and creorder, New York, Routledge.

PALERMO Giulio (2007), “The ontology of economic power in capitalism: mainstream economics and Marx”, Cambridge Journal of Economics, 31(4), p. 539-56

PIKETTY Thomas (2013), Le Capital au XXIe siècle, Paris, Seuil

POULANTZAS N. (2013 [1976]), L’Etat, le pouvoir et le socialisme, Paris, Les prairies ordinaires.

RAND Ayn (1986 [1967]), Capitalism. The Unknown Ideal, Londres, Penguin

ROBINSON Joan (1976[1956]), L’accumulation du capital, Paris, Dunod

STREECK Wolfgang (2010), “E pluribus unum ? Varieties and commonalities of capitalism”, MPIFG discussion papers, 10/12

STREECK Wolfgang (2015 [2013]), Le temps acheté. La crise sans cesse ajournée du capitalisme démocratique, Paris, Gallimard

THÉRET B. (1992), Les régimes économiques de l’ordre, Paris, PUF.

THÉRET B. (1999), “La régulation politique, le point de vue d’un économiste”, dans Commaille J., Jobert B. (dir.), Les métamorphoses de la régulation politique, Paris, lgdj, Droit et société, pp. 83-118.

VERCELLONE Carlo (2008), « La thèse du capitalisme cognitif : une mise en perspective historique et théorique », in COLLETIS Gabriel, PAULRE Bernard. (dir.), Les nouveaux horizons du capitalisme. Pouvoirs, valeurs, temps, Paris, Economica, p. 71-95

VERCELLONE Carlo (2014), “From the Mass-Worker To Cognitive Labour: Historical and Theoretical Considerations”, in VAN DER LINDEN Marcel, ROTH Karl Heinz, HENNINGER Max (eds.), Beyond Marx. Theorising the Global Labour Relations of the Twenty-First Century, Chicago, Haymarket

WALLERSTEIN Immanuel (1974), The modern World-System, Capitalist Agriculture and the Origins of the European World Economy in the Sixteenth Century, New York, Academic Press

WEBER Max (1991 [1923]), Histoire économique. Esquisse d’une histoire universelle de l’économie et de la société, Paris, Gallimard

WEBER Max (2008 [1905]), L’éthique protestante et l’esprit du capitalisme, Paris, Champ-Flammarion

WEBER Max (2014 [1921]), La ville, Paris, La découverte,

WOOD Ellen Meiksins (1981), “The separation of the economic and political in capitalism”, New Left Review, n° 127

 

Capitalisme et ressources naturelles : quelles structures politiques ?

Rencontres de la science politique

 Association française de science politique

 
Atelier de recherche du groupe SPoC
(Structures politiques du capitalisme)
 
 
Capitalisme et ressources naturelles :
quelles structures politiques ?
 
4 juillet 2018 – 14h-16h45 
MSH Paris Nord / Saint-Denis – Auditorium
 
 
1e partie
 
Sébastien CHAILLEUX (Université de Pau et des Pays de l’Adour, UMR Passages) 
Lextraction des ressources naturelles du sous-sol face aux critiques : le régime extractiviste et laccumulation capitaliste
 
Matthieu LE QUANG  (Université Paris 7, EA LCSP) 
Extractivisme en Amérique Latine : écologie politique d’une accumulation par expropriation
 
 
2e partie
 
Stéphanie BARRAL (INRA, UMR LISIS) 
Les banques de biodiversité aux Etats-Unis : de l’obligation réglementaire à l’accumulation
 
Yannick RUMPALA (Université de Nice, EA CERMES) 
Nature et écologie dans les structures politiques du capitalisme
 
 
Discutants : 
Fabrice FLIPO (Institut Mines Telecom, EA LCSP)
Matthieu ANSALONI (EA LaSSP Toulouse)
Antoine ROGER (Sciences Po Bordeaux, UMR CED) 

Accumuler et convertir des capitaux?

Les resorts du capitalisme en Europe centrale et orientale

Antoine ROGER

A propos de :  Gil Eyal, Ivan Szelenyi & Eleanor Townsley, Making Capitalism Without Capitalists : The New Ruling Elites in Eastern Europe, Londres, Verso, 2000

Dans une conférence prononcée à Berlin-Est le 25 octobre 1989, Pierre Bourdieu s’interroge lui-même sur l’application de son modèle au cas de la République Démocratique d’Allemagne. Deux catégories d’agents s’affrontent selon lui dans les « régimes qu’il faut appeler soviétiques ». Les « hommes d’appareils » détiennent un « capital politique spécifique de type soviétique » déterminé non seulement par « la position dans la hiérarchie des appareils politiques » mais aussi par « l’ancienneté de chaque agent et de sa lignée dans les dynasties politiques » ; dans une logique de « patrimonialisation des ressources collectives », les intéressés peuvent se livrer « une forme d’appropriation privée de biens et de services publics ». Une seconde catégorie est formée par « les détenteurs de capital scolaire », « technocrates et surtout chercheurs ou intellectuels, pour une part issus eux-mêmes de membres de la Nomenklatura politique ». Une dynamique de contestation peut être mise en évidence sur cette base : « les détenteurs de capital scolaire sont sans doute les plus inclinés à la révolte contre les privilèges des détenteurs de capital politique, et aussi les plus capables de retourner contre la Nomenklatura les professions de foi égalitaires ou méritocratiques qui sont au fondement de la légitimité qu’elle revendique »[1].

Plusieurs chercheurs réunis autour d’Ivan Szelenyi s’appuient sur cette analyse pour caractériser les espèces de capital valorisées en Europe centrale et orientale depuis 1990. Ils relativisent l’importance du « capital politique » et attribuent un rôle prépondérant au « capital culturel ».  Pour prendre la mesure de cette hiérarchie, il importe selon eux de restituer les trajectoires suivies sous le régime communiste.

Un corps de technocrates s’est tout d’abord formé au sein de l’appareil communiste: ses membres ont été désignés à des postes de responsabilité sur la foi de leurs compétences et ont adhéré au Parti par simple obligation. En s’efforçant d’asseoir l’économie sur des règles de bonne gestion, ils se sont démarqués des militants communistes plus âgés, arrivés au sommet de la hiérarchie au seul bénéfice de leur engagement idéologique. Des intellectuels pétris de culture occidentale se sont constitués dans le même temps en « bourgeoisie culturelle ». Attachés à promouvoir le développement de la « société civile », ils se sont posés en apôtres de la liberté d’entreprendre et de la propriété privée. Une classe d’« entrepreneurs socialistes » a enfin vu le jour durant les années 1970. Ses membres ont tissé les fils d’une économie secondaire en se livrant à un petit commerce de proximité, en marge de leur activité officielle. Leurs efforts conjugués ont favorisé l’essor d’un « capitalisme par le bas »[2].

Les technocrates ont rapidement percé ce mécanisme à jour et n’ont eu de cesse de l’éradiquer au bénéfice d’un « capitalisme par le haut ». Le petit négoce présentait à leurs yeux un caractère irrationnel ; il ne permettait pas de réaliser des économies d’échelle et d’obtenir des produits compétitifs sur les marchés internationaux. Un système de crédits à l’industrie devait bien plutôt être développé qui pouvait offrir une plus grande autonomie aux unités de production constituées. Pour soutenir ce projet, les technocrates ont sollicité l’appui de la bourgeoisie culturelle. Une alliance de revers a été conclue de la sorte qui visait à mettre sur la touche les entrepreneurs socialistes.

Depuis l’effondrement du régime communiste, une recomposition sociale peut être observée: les divisions anciennes ne sont pas abolies mais leur signification évolue. Les entrepreneurs socialistes se transforment en « petits capitalistes » : ne pouvant tirer avantage de la privatisation du secteur public, ils se livrent à des petites activités commerciales et tentent d’amorcer une dynamique d’accumulation.

Les technocrates se transmuent en « managers». Ils exploitent capital culturel qu’il sont parvenus à thésauriser sous le régime communiste : leur parfaite connaissance du secteur public et leur aptitude à gérer dans le même temps les mécanismes de l’économie de marché constituent des avantages sans équivalents. Le contexte post-communiste génère des zones d’opacité dont tirent partis les agents qui disposent de repères assurés. Les managers créent des « firmes satellites » dans le but de conclure des contrats avantageux avec les entreprises publiques dans lequel ils étaient jusqu’alors employés. Ils cumulent ainsi les avantages : les risques courus par la maison mère sont endossés par l’Etat et les contribuables ; les bénéfices sont « siphonnés » par les firmes satellites. Le capital politique détenu par les cadres communistes plus âgés est de faible rendement en comparaison: le réseau de connaissances qu’une ancienne appartenance aux hautes sphères du Parti permet de tisser peut servir de coussin amortisseur mais non de tremplin économique[3].

Les managers bénéficient du climat imposé par l’« idéologie monétariste » : les politiques de restriction budgétaire facilitent et légitiment les marchandages avec les responsables des entreprises publiques. La bourgeoisie intellectuelle apporte un concours décisif sur ce terrain. Dans le prolongement des combats engagés sous le régime communiste, elle s’attache à promouvoir la « culture civique ». A cette fin, elle met au point des « rites sacrificiels et expiatoires ». Selon son discours, le plein épanouissement de la société exige que chacun consente à des sacrifices et pourchasse en son tréfonds les habitudes héritées de la période communiste. Les managers transposent ce prédicat au terrain économique et le transforment en vecteur de l’idéologie monétariste : il convient selon eux d’éradiquer les comportements contraires aux lois du marché.

L’idéologie monétariste favorise en somme la formation d’un « bloc de pouvoir hégémonique » qui prolonge l’alliance nouée sous le régime communiste entre technocrates et bourgeoisie intellectuelle. Les partis politiques feignent de défendre des programmes distinctifs ; dans les faits, ils sont tous contrôlés par les mêmes élites économiques et culturelles ; ils servent à l’entretien du dispositif institué et préviennent la formation de mouvements contestataires. Les catégories de la population qui ne tirent pas bénéfice de la conversion à l’économie de marché sont incapables de trouver un relais politique à leurs griefs. Elles n’ont d’autre possibilité que d’adopter un comportement abstentionniste ou de voter au hasard, sans s’investir véritablement dans l’acte électoral[4].

Les analyses ainsi livrées exploitent une partie du schéma explicatif bourdieusien en la déconnectant des textes et des explications qui lui donnent toute sa portée : l’accumulation et la conversion des capitaux ne sont pas référées aux mécanismes de fabrication et de représentation des groupes. Un simple rapport de cause à effet est établi entre la possession d’un portefeuille fourni en certains capitaux et l’exercice d’une domination politique. Les mécanismes intermédiaires mis au jour par Pierre Bourdieu ne sont pas pris en compte.

 

[1] Bourdieu Pierre, « La variante ‘soviétique’ et le capital politique », in Raisons pratiques, Paris, Seuil, 1994, pp. 31-35

[2] Eyal Gil, Szelenyi Ivan & Townsley Eleanor, “The theory of post-communist managerialism: elites and classes in post-communist transformation” New Left Review, n° 222, 1997, pp. 60-92

[3] Szelenyi Ivan, Social Conflicts of Post-communist Transitions. Budapest: Institute of Political Science, Hungarian Academy of Sciences, 1992 ; Szelenyi Ivan & King Larry, “The New Capitalism of Eastern Europe: Towards a Comparative Political Economy of Postcommunist Capitalisms” in Smelser Neil & Swedberg Richard (dirs.), Handbook of Economic Sociology, Princeton, Princeton University Press, 2002.

[4] Eyal Gil, Szelenyi Ivan & Townsley Eleanor, Making Capitalism Without Capitalists : The New Ruling Elites in Eastern Europe, Londres, Verso, 2000, pp. 162-174 ; Szelenyi Ivan & Szelenyi Szonja, “Introduction”, Theory and Society, 24(5), 1995, pp. 615-638 ; Szelenyi Ivan & Glass Christy “Winners of the reforms: the new economic and political elite” in Vladimir Mikhalev (dir.), Income Distribution and social Structure during the Transition, Londres, Blackwell, 2002

Supports pédagogiques

Jonathan Nitzan (York University – Toronto)

Capital and Power In the Global Political Economy

Political Economy of Capital Accumulation

Global Capital : Political Economy of Capitalist Power

The Capitalist Mode of Power

 

Gregory Albo (York University – Toronto)

Theories of Contemporary Capitalism

 

Michael W. Donnelly (University of Toronto)

Capitalism and the City

 

Alfred P. Montero (Carleton University – Ottawa)

Capitalism and its critics

 

Sven Beckert & Christine Desan (Harvard University – Cambridge MA)

The Political Economy of Modern Capitalism

 

Monica Prasad (Northwestern University – Chicago)

Global capitalism

 

Elizabeth Onasch (Northwestern University – Chicago)

Global Capitalism

 

Michael Pirson & Nicholas Tampio (Fordham University – New York)

Capitalism and its Alternatives

 

Daniel Pope (University of Oregon)

Thinking about Capitalism

 

Pepper D. Culpepper & Philipp Genschel (European University Institute – Florence)

Comparative Political Economy

 

Répertoire scientifique

Centres et collectifs de recherche

Program on the study of capitalism at Harvard University

The history of capitalism at the University of Georgia

Robert L. Heilbroner Center for Capitalism Studies at the New School for Social Research

Progress in political economy (University of Sydney)

Center for global political economy (University of Sussex)

Max-Planck-Institut für Gesellschaftsforschung (Cologne)

 

Réseaux et associations scientifiques 

Critical political economy research network (European sociological association)

International initiative for promoting political economy

Society for the advancement of socio-economics

Association française d’économie politique

Réseau thématique “Sociologie économique” (Association française de sociologie)

Le capitalisme est-il (encore) régulé?

Régimes de politique économique et développements du capitalisme

Matthieu ANSALONI

A propos de : Robert Boyer, Économie politique des capitalismes. Théorie de la régulation et des crises, Paris, La Découverte, 2015.

Publié dans la Revue française de science politique, 67(1), 2017, p. 264

 

Économie politique des capitalismes fait le point sur les recherches entreprises depuis quatre décennies par l’école de régulation. L’ouvrage est de facture originale : la première partie, « les Fondamentaux », présente les concepts fondateurs de la théorie de la régulation. Formes institutionnelles, modes de régulation (donc crises), régimes de croissance – autant d’outils qui furent forgés à l’occasion de l’analyse du capitalisme d’après-guerre. La seconde partie, « Les développements », présente quant à elle les avancées conceptuelles de la théorie qu’a suscité l’analyse de la déstabilisation du capitalisme d’après-guerre et l’investigation de nouveaux terrains (Amérique latine et Asie notamment). Sont tour à tour introduits les concepts de modèles productifs, de systèmes nationaux d’innovation, de régimes d’inégalité ou bien de dispositifs institutionnels de l’environnement. La démultiplication des arrangements institutionnels pose aussi la question de la mise en cohérence des modes de régulation et des régimes de croissance. Ici intervient une dernière innovation conceptuelle, celle de régime de politique économique. On le voit, la conception de l’ouvrage est donc singulière : il ne présente pas, comme d’ordinaire, un modèle et sa mise en opération. Il resitue au contraire le développement historique de la théorie de la régulation que l’analyse de l’évolution du capitalisme a induit. Ce choix, pour partie dicté par des contraintes éditoriales (la première partie de l’ouvrage avait été publiée en 2004), présente cependant un grand intérêt pédagogique: la base conceptuelle de la théorie est exposée pas à pas, au fil des évolutions du capitalisme, toujours singulières dans le temps et dans l’espace. Ainsi, la théorie se veut résolument être le fruit de l’empirie : l’exposition de l’ouvrage inscrit sans relâche la genèse des évolutions conceptuelles que les dynamiques du capitalisme suscitent. Mais le grand intérêt pédagogique de l’ouvrage tient aussi à la volonté de son auteur de resituerles recherches entreprises par l’école de la régulation au sein des sciences sociales : les concepts et les résultats sontconstamment confrontés à la théorie économique classique, mais aussi à la théorie institutionnaliste (dans sa version historique notamment). C’est donc un manuel d’économie politique que signe-là Robert Boyer. L’auteur offre, dans un style limpide, une synthèse de travaux impressionnante, tenant ensemble bilans théorique et empirique.

S’il est impossible de présenter dans le détail un ouvrage aussi riche, nous voudrions en souligner quelques intérêts majeurs pour le politiste. D’abord, en mobilisant le concept de capitalisme, c’est une théorie de sciences sociales que propose Robert Boyer. Sa démarche tranche donc singulièrement dans le paysage académique contemporain marqué par une spécialisation disciplinaire croissante. L’enchâssement social de l’économique conduit Robert Boyer à penser conjointement sphères politique et économique. C’est là tout l’intérêt de la notion de régime de politique économique qui vient s’articuler aux concepts fondateurs de la théorie : chaque mode de régulation est associé à un régime de politique économique (soit un bloc hégémonique, un référentiel, des instruments et des organisations spécifiques) qui assure la mise en cohérence des arrangements institutionnels qui le composent (rapport salarial, régime monétaire, forme de la concurrence par exemple). Cette modélisation permet à Robert Boyer de dresser une typologie des régimes de politique économique en fonction du type de capitalisme: l’idéal-type du monétarisme et du néolibéralisme, dans lequel  la stabilité des prix prime sur la quête d’un équilibre entre inflation et chômage, vise l’universalisation du modèle du marché. Le bloc hégémonique, dont ont été exclus les salariés, s’articule autour des détenteurs de capitaux financiers. Les procédures démocratiques ont été évidées : la politique économique leur échappe, les États étant placés sous le joug de leurs créanciers.

Ensuite, autre intérêt majeur, l’analyse comparative de long terme des évolutions du capitalisme permet à l’auteur de tordre le cou aux théories de la convergence. Le parti-pris institutionnaliste conduit l’auteur à souligner la diversité des capitalismes. Tout en intégrant dans l’analyse les phénomènes de dénationalisation de l’autorité politique, il fait l’hypothèse d’une concurrence des capitalismes nationaux à l’échelle internationale : la domination de la version nord-américaine a en effet pour conséquence d’accentuer les spécialisations économiques. Cette thèse est appuyée sur une analyse des évolutions des capitalismes chinois et asiatique notamment. Une analyse endogène de leurs transformations institutionnelles en termes d’endométabolisme et d’hybridation est esquissée.

On l’aura compris,Robert Boyer signe ici ce qui est à nos yeux un ouvrage important.

Capital strikes back !

Capital strikes back! La mise à mal de la tutelle démocratique sur l’économie capitaliste

 Matthieu ANSALONI

À propos de Wolfgang Streeck, Buying time. The delayed crisis of democratic capitalism, Verso, London/New York, 2014.

Publié dans, Gouvernement et action publique, 2(2), 2015, pp. 159-165

Introduction

Il ne fait aucun doute que le dernier ouvrage de Wolfgang Streeck constitue un livre important. Il a d’ores et déjà reçu un vif écho : à peine un an après sa publication, cet ouvrage est traduit dans treize langues[1]. L’auteur propose une théorie de la crise fiscale et financière de 2007 qui, selon lui, est le fruit de la révolution néolibérale qui a miné le capitalisme démocratique de l’Après-guerre. Ce phénomène s’accompagne – c’est là un élément central de la réflexion proposée par l’auteur – de la mise à mal de la tutelle démocratique sur l’économie capitaliste[2]. L’ouvrage, qui constitue un brillant effort de théorisation, est l’aboutissement d’un riche parcours de recherche que nous ne pouvons qu’esquisser ici : sociologue de l’économie, Wolfgang Streeck a d’abord porté son attention sur les groupes d’intérêt industriels et le corporatisme, puis, à partir des années 1990, sur le capitalisme et ses évolutions. À ce propos, l’auteur a fortement participé à développer l’étude des transformations contemporaines du capitalisme[3] – un champ de recherche désormais connu sous l’appellation de « Variétés du capitalisme » (Varieties of capitalism).

Wolfgang Streeck propose une analyse de la crise fiscale et financière qui, selon lui, repose sur trois inspirations théoriques. Sa pensée emprunte, d’abord, à la théorie de la crise de l’École de Francfort : pour l’auteur, l’ordre social est fragile et précaire ; les crises se développent, sans nécessairement aboutir à un état d’équilibre. Il développe une vision agonistique de l’ordre social : les institutions – fruits des luttes sociales – sont intrinsèquement contradictoires, instables et provisoires. Elles constituent des compromis fragiles, émanant des luttes conduites par des acteurs qui, dotés de ressources inégales, poursuivent des intérêts propres. La perspective de Wolfgang Streeck se nourrit, ensuite, de la théorie institutionnaliste contemporaine, dans sa version historique : il dit proposer une lecture dynamique de la crise du capitalisme démocratique, inscrite dans une séquence de développement. Son analyse remonte ainsi aux années 1960, lorsque débute la dissolution du capitalisme démocratique d’après-guerre. Au-delà de la prise en compte du temps long, l’institutionnalisme, nous dit Wolfgang Streeck, le conduit à souligner la singularité des contextes spatio-temporels, ce qui le conduit à porter son attention sur les trajectoires nationales. Enfin, l’auteur avoue sa dette à l’égard de Karl Marx : il adopte notamment l’idée selon laquelle des contre-tendances atténuent, ralentissent, modifient le changement social[4]. Cette vision est au cœur de la thèse que développe l’ouvrage : en apaisant les conflits sociaux, des contre-tendances – des politiques monétaires – ont permis d’ajourner, tout en l’aggravant, la crise du capitalisme démocratique. L’ouvrage de Wolfgang Streeck est donc symptomatique du regain d’intérêt des sciences sociales pour le capitalisme depuis les années 1990[5]. Précisément, l’auteur appréhende le capitalisme comme une construction historique et sociale, mettant l’accent sur sa nature évolutive. Plutôt que d’analyser le capitalisme à partir de ses seules institutions (le rapport salarial, la monnaie, le régime de concurrence par exemple), il souligne sa dimension systémique[6]. Ce parti-pris, on le verra en détail, lui permet d’analyser conjointement les transformations du capitalisme et de la démocratie.

 

De la révolte du capital à la crise fiscale et financière

Le premier chapitre traite de la crise actuelle du capitalisme, principalement dans ses dimensions fiscale et financière. S’il s’en distingue, Wolfgang Streeck élabore son raisonnement à partir de la théorie de la crise développée dans les années 1970 par les penseurs de l’École de Francfort[7] : selon eux, la boîte à outils keynésienne devait prévenir les crises économiques, assurant la croissance, donc la prospérité. La crise du capitalisme tenait à son acceptation sociale – de la part des travailleurs précisément : la prospérité susciterait de nouvelles aspirations sociales, minant la discipline nécessaire à une économie capitaliste. Selon la terminologie de Jürgen Habermas, la crise visait donc non pas l’intégration systémique (à savoir l’ajustement entre des systèmes qui composent la société), mais l’intégration sociale (à savoir la cohésion des valeurs et des symboles par lesquels les individus s’identifient à la société).

Cette théorie de la crise a été invalidée avec force par les crises financière, fiscale et économique qui, depuis les années 1970, mettent à mal la viabilité systémique de l’économie capitaliste. Wolfgang Streeck propose une lecture alternative de la crise dans laquelle le « capital » est perçu non pas comme un moyen de production, mais comme un acteur, donc une force sociale. Dans cette perspective, la croissance et le plein-emploi ne sont pas des enjeux techniques, mais politiques : la croissance et le plein-emploi dépendent de la volonté des détenteurs de capitaux à investir, donc de leur volonté à préserver l’ordre social. Lorsque les investisseurs jugent l’environnement social hostile, ils sont en mesure de retirer leur argent. Dans cette optique, les crises économiques ne sont ni plus ni moins que des crises de confiance. Les crises économiques ne sont donc pas le fruit d’aléas techniques : ce sont des crises de légitimation. Ainsi, contrairement à ce que supposaient dans les années 1970 les théoriciens de la crise, le déficit de légitimation n’est pas le fait des travailleurs, mais des détenteurs du capital. En effet, depuis les années 1970, les développements du capitalisme sont, selon Wolfgang Streeck, le fruit de la « révolte du capital » : les détenteurs de capitaux ont souhaité se débarrasser des politiques sociales et des arrangements corporatistes institués à l’issue de la Seconde-guerre mondiale. La crise énergétique a catalysé cette stratégie : dans un double contexte d’épuisement des gains de productivité et de maturation de la consommation de masse, les détenteurs de capitaux ont pris conscience que les taux élevés de croissance appartenaient au passé. Il leur fallait donc défaire l’économie capitaliste des contrôles politique et corporatiste de la Libération pour renouer avec des profits désormais tirés de marchés nouveaux (issus des privatisations par exemple) et des déréglementations. À partir des années 1980, la révolution néolibérale a fait son œuvre, minant les éléments du capitalisme démocratique de l’Après-guerre ; à savoir : la garantie politique du plein-emploi ; les négociations salariales collectives ; la participation des travailleurs dans l’entreprise ; le contrôle étatique d’industries stratégiques ; un vaste secteur public délivrant des prestations sociales, etc. Dans le même temps, le marché du travail a été dérégulé, comme les marchés des biens, des services et des capitaux.

Mais, selon l’auteur, la révolution néolibérale n’a pu se faire qu’avec la participation active de l’État dont l’action a permis de préserver l’ordre social. Un apport de l’ouvrage de Wolfgang Streeck consiste justement à préciser la contribution de l’État à la révolution néolibérale : depuis les années 1970, des instruments monétaires successifs ont maintenu l’illusion de croissance et de prospérité, légitimant auprès des travailleurs le projet néolibéral : l’inflation d’abord ; la dette publique ensuite ; le « keynésianisme privatisé[8] » enfin. Chaque instrument a permis d’« acheter du temps », repoussant, en l’aggravant, la crise du capitalisme démocratique – notamment dans ses dimensions fiscale et financière. Chacun a été abandonné quand il a commencé à empêcher l’accumulation du capital, plus qu’il ne la supportait. Le coût de chacun de ses instruments monétaires reposait sur les travailleurs : par exemple, la fin de l’inflation a induit un chômage structurel, signant le déclin des syndicats et de leur pouvoir de négociation collective. Ces instruments, qui ont permis d’acheter du temps, ont induit une transformation profonde des appareils d’État.

 

L’État débiteur, fruit de la révolution néolibérale

Le deuxième chapitre de l’ouvrage traite de la substitution du modèle de l’État fiscal (tax state) – un État qui couvre ses besoins par les prélèvements, par la figure de l’État débiteur (debt state) – un État qui couvre ses besoins par l’emprunt plus que par la fiscalité. Pour Wolfgang Streeck, cette transformation n’est pas le fruit d’une faillite de la démocratie, comme le suppose la théorie économique standard. Cette thèse, qui a grandement pénétré le sens commun, est connue : soucieux de sa reproduction, le personnel politique satisferait les demandes croissantes des électeurs, au prix d’une dégradation de l’état des finances publiques. Pour l’auteur, l’essor des dettes publiques tient à l’incapacité des États à extraire les moyens dont ils ont besoin pour mener à bien leurs tâches croissantes. Précisément, depuis la Libération, l’augmentation de la productivité du capital n’est pas allée de pair avec l’augmentation du taux d’imposition des hauts revenus, bien au contraire. De plus, dans le même temps, l’internationalisation de l’économie a accru la compétition fiscale entre les pays, favorisant l’abaissement des fiscalités nationales. Pour Wolfgang Streeck, l’État débiteur est donc ni plus ni moins le produit de la révolution néolibérale orchestrée par les détenteurs de capitaux, dont l’avènement a nécessité le développement d’une puissante industrie de la finance et l’internationalisation des marchés financiers. L’auteur relève que des contre-tendances ont toutefois atténué l’affirmation de l’État-débiteur, telles que les privatisations des biens et des services publics. Quoiqu’il en soit, dans les années 1990, le glas de l’État fiscal avait sonné.

L’avènement de l’État débiteur a de lourdes implications démocratiques. Le niveau d’endettement des États est tel que ses créanciers privés ont une faible confiance en leur capacité à satisfaire leurs obligations ; les détenteurs de capitaux exercent donc une forte pression sur les États pour minimiser l’influence de leurs citoyens. Pour ce faire, ils concentrent et cumulent de vastes ressources : ils sont à tout moment susceptibles de retirer leurs capitaux, menaçant les États de banqueroute. De plus, les détenteurs de capitaux bénéficient du soutien d’organisations internationales – au premier rang desquelles l’Union européenne – pour mettre au pas les États. Pour l’auteur, l’État débiteur a donc deux corps (constituencies) : les citoyens (staatsvolk) ; les créanciers (marktvolk). Il en résulte un rétrécissement drastique du champ de la démocratie : les souverainetés nationales trouvent comme limite la discipline des marchés financiers. Ce phénomène est désormais gravé dans les Constitutions : la « règle d’or » (à savoir le plafonnement du déficit public en pourcentage du produit intérieur brut) n’est rien d’autre que la limitation du champ de la souveraineté au profit des marchés financiers. De fait, faute de marge de manœuvre, les États sont voués à des politiques d’austérité pour assurer le financement de leur dette. En découle une apathie électorale croissante, les citoyens perdant confiance en la capacité d’action autonome des États. Le « there is no alternative », selon l’expression célèbre de Margaret Thatcher, n’est plus simplement que rhétorique : il figure désormais au sommet de la hiérarchie des normes juridiques. L’abandon des souverainetés nationales à des organisations internationales telles que l’Union européenne est non seulement devenu un instrument pour protéger les détenteurs des dettes publiques, mais aussi pour immuniser les marchés des interférences démocratiques. En conséquence, le capitalisme a, selon Wolfgang Streeck, été vidé de la démocratie.

 

L’État de consolidation pour immuniser le capitalisme de la démocratie

Le troisième et dernier chapitre de l’ouvrage vise à analyser la disjonction entre capitalisme et démocratie. Wolfgang Streeck introduit pour cela le concept d’État de consolidation (consolidation state). Selon Wolfgang Streeck, l’aggravement des crises fiscale et financière tend à transformer l’État débiteur en une organisation politique nouvelle, l’État de consolidation, dont l’objet est de préserver la confiance du second corps (constituency) de l’État contemporain – ses créanciers.

L’État de consolidation a pour caractéristique de se développer au-delà des frontières nationales : pour mener les politiques de consolidation des finances publiques, les exécutifs nationaux ont fait le choix de déléguer des pans de souveraineté à des organisations internationales non-démocratiques – notamment en matière monétaire. Ce faisant, en soustrayant le capitalisme du contrôle démocratique, il leur était possible de contourner les oppositions domestiques – les travailleurs et leurs organisations. Selon Wolfgang Streeck, l’Union européenne, depuis les années 1990, a pris une telle forme[9]. Précisément, l’Union monétaire a constitué un mécanisme-clé pour libérer le capitalisme de la démocratie : « the purpose of the whole edifice, whose completion is drawing ever closer, is to depolitize the economy while at the same time de-democratizing politics » (p. 116). L’auteur rappelle en effet que depuis son origine l’Union monétaire est allée de pair avec la consolidation budgétaire : les États membres sont depuis sa création dans l’impossibilité formelle de présenter un déficit annuel supérieur à trois pourcent de leur Produit Intérieur Brut (PIB) et une dette publique supérieure à soixante pourcent de leur PIB. Excluant par construction le recours à la dévaluation, l’Union monétaire a donc réduit drastiquement le champ des possibles des politiques macro-économiques nationales. La seule option qui reste aux États est donc la « dévaluation interne » : la baisse des revenus ; les coupes dans les dépenses sociales ; la refonte du droit du travail. C’est pourquoi, depuis l’Union monétaire, l’Union européenne est devenue pour l’auteur une « machine à libéraliser ». L’État de consolidation repose donc sur une vision minimale de l’État, dont l’action se borne à permettre le fonctionnement des marchés en garantissant la propriété privée et la liberté. Comme pour tout changement social, l’avènement de l’État de consolidation est selon l’auteur atténué par des contre-tendances qui se déploient lors des élections ou bien dans les rues – en Italie, en Grèce et en Espagne notamment.

 

Penser le capitalisme comme un phénomène hégémonique

En proposant une théorie de la crise fiscale et financière, Wolfgang Streeck offre donc une lecture globale de l’évolution du capitalisme depuis l’Après-guerre. Il décrypte pour cela les transformations qui ont affecté ses principales composantes institutionnelles (le rapport salarial, les formes de la concurrence, la monnaie, l’État par exemple). À vrai dire, comme le prévient d’ailleurs l’auteur, son analyse est à bien des égards convenue : par exemple, la Théorie de la régulation – courant de pensées pionnier dans l’étude des transformations du capitalisme – a d’ores et déjà suscité des analyses similaires qui, sur le plan de l’analyse, présentent l’avantage de pousser davantage la formalisation[10]. La plus-value de l’ouvrage réside ailleurs : l’originalité de Wolfgang Streeck est de penser les rapports changeants entre capitalisme et démocratie. Ce faisant, son analyse se démarque tendanciellement des études d’économie politique actuelles qui ont principalement cherché à éclairer la résilience des politiques néolibérales qui ont engendrée la crise de 2007. Pour Colin Crouch, ce phénomène tient principalement à l’imbrication des grandes firmes, caractéristiques du capitalisme néolibéral, dans les appareils d’État[11]. Mark Blyth, quant à lui, a souligné l’absence d’instruments alternatifs et la puissance symbolique du diagnostic sur lequel reposent les politiques d’austérité[12]. Enfin, dans le même ordre d’idées, Vivien Schmidt et Mark Thatcher ont insisté sur la teneur du projet néolibéral, dont la plasticité et la simplicité assurent le succès[13]. Pour sa part, Wolfgang Streeck montre comment la transformation néolibérale de l’économie n’a été possible qu’en brisant la tutelle démocratique sur le capitalisme par le biais d’une nouvelle formation politique – l’État de consolidation. Il résulte de ce phénomène un appauvrissement de la démocratie : désormais, le champ de la souveraineté étatique s’arrête à la discipline qu’imposent les marchés financiers. Une contrainte nouvelle pèse donc sur les États : préserver la confiance de leurs créanciers en leur capacité à financer le remboursement des dettes publiques. Les politiques d’austérité s’imposent donc comme une nécessité, tandis que les plans de relance appartiennent pour ainsi dire au passé. La capacité d’action autonome des États se restreint donc drastiquement. Wolfgang Streeck relève que les citoyens ne sont d’ailleurs pas dupes : il établit, statistiques à l’appui, une corrélation entre la croissance de l’apathie électorale et la montée en puissance des « forces du marché ». On le voit, en pensant conjointement les transformations du politique et de l’activité économique, l’effort de théorisation de Wolfgang Streeck donne de l’intelligibilité aux mutations profondes qui traversent nos sociétés.

L’ouvrage fait cependant naître de nombreuses interrogations : l’effort de théorisation implique une argumentation générale, laissant dans l’ombre bon nombre de faits. En effet, l’analyse met l’accent sur les structures – en l’occurrence les classes sociales, aux dépens des acteurs. Imputer la révolution néolibérale à la révolte du capital constitue une hypothèse séduisante. Cependant, au terme de l’ouvrage, le lecteur sait peu de choses sur le « capital » – les propriétés des agents qui le composent, leurs visions, ressources et stratégies de coalition. La dépendance des États à l’égard des détenteurs de capitaux n’est décrite que sommairement, et seulement à travers le prisme des marchés financiers. De plus, les résistances auxquelles le capital a dû faire face ne sont également qu’esquissées. Enfin, contrairement à ce qu’il annonce, l’auteur fait peu de place aux trajectoires nationales. Dans une certaine mesure, la thèse défendue par Wolfgang Streeck pâtit de cette argumentation générale : une lecture rapide pourrait donner à penser que l’auteur postule un fonctionnalisme de l’État dans la dynamique de l’accumulation du capital. Ainsi, les instruments monétaires que Wolfgang Streeck identifie auraient pour fonction d’ajourner la crise du capitalisme démocratique en assurant la paix sociale[14]. Bien sûr, cette impression de fonctionnalisme tient à l’observation ex-post des contre-tendances. Celui qui connaît les écrits de Wolfgang Streeck sait que pour cet auteur les institutions – ici les instruments macro-économiques – sont le fruit de luttes que mènent des agents qui, dotés de ressources singulières, poursuivent des intérêts distincts. Il n’empêche que la lecture de l’ouvrage – et plus largement des études sur les variétés du capitalisme – fait naître le désir de voir émerger une analyse saisissant le capitalisme contemporain comme le fruit de luttes hégémoniques. Une telle perspective ferait toute sa place aux jeux des acteurs qui visent à influer sur les institutions du capitalisme, telles que le rapport salarial, les formes de concurrence ou bien encore la monnaie. Ici comme ailleurs, l’œuvre de Max Weber pourrait servir d’aiguillon – le sociologue allemand ayant analysé l’activité économique (soit la fourniture de prestations) à travers le triptyque « transactions, acteurs (entreprises), groupements régulateurs (État, corporations)[15] ». Bien sûr, une telle perspective impliquerait un changement d’échelle de l’analyse : les études sur les variétés du capitalisme privilégient le niveau macroéconomique des modes de régulation, distinguant des trajectoires nationales. Penser le capitalisme comme un phénomène hégémonique conduirait à privilégier l’étude d’industries particulières[16], bref favoriser l’échelle sectorielle, pour envisager ensuite les mécanismes globaux qui permettent leur mise en cohérence (les formes de concurrence, la monnaie, l’État par exemple).

On pourrait penser que la science politique à la française, qui se distingue par son ancrage dans la discipline sociologique, est bien armée pour développer une telle perspective. Il s’agirait d’infléchir quelque peu le programme de recherche de la Théorie de la régulation, en éclairant la façon dont sont noués les compromis institutionnalisés qui sont à l’origine des formes institutionnelles du capitalisme. On peut même penser que de telles études pourraient trouver aisément leur place dans les débats anglo-saxons, la Théorie de la régulation ayant acquis ses lettres de noblesse dans le monde académique international[17]. L’effort reste toutefois à produire : en atteste le silence de la science politique française au sujet de la crise actuelle du capitalisme !

 

Matthieu Ansaloni (Centre Émile Durkheim/Université de Bordeaux, Laboratoire des Sciences sociales du politique/Sciences-po Toulouse).

[1] Ce livre est le fruit de trois leçons prononcées par Wolfgang Streeck à l’Institut für Sozialforschung de Francfort en 2012 à l’invitation de son directeur, Axel Honneth. Cela explique la forme que l’ouvrage, qui se compose de trois chapitres correspondant aux trois leçons, déroge quelque peu aux canons académiques, présentant notamment de nombreux va-et-vient tout au long du texte.

[2] Cette hypothèse a été développée récemment par Colin Crouch (C. Crouch, Post-démocratie, Diaphane, Paris, 2013).

[3] Voir, dans une production particulièrement abondante : C. Crouch, W. Streeck (Eds), Political economy of modern capitalism. Mapping convergence and diversity, SAGE, London, 1997 ; W. Streeck, K. Thelen (Eds), Beyond continuity. Institutional change in advanced economies, Oxford University Press, Oxford, 2005 ; W. Streeck, Re-forming capitalism: institutional change in the German political economy, Oxford University Press, Oxford, 2009.

[4] Pour Karl Marx, la chute tendancielle du taux de profit, qui devait à terme conduire à la dissolution du capitalisme, devait être atténuée par des contre-tendances.

[5] R. Boyer (2007), « Capitalism strikes back. Why and what consequences for social sciences ? », Revue de la régulation, Vol. 1, 2007 (http//regulation.revues.org/).

[6] W. Streeck (2011), « Taking capitalism seriously : towards an institutionalist approach to contemporary political economy », Socio-economic review, Vol. 9, pp. 137-167.

[7] Voir, notamment : J. Habermas, Raison et légitimité. Problème de légitimation dans le capitalisme avancé, Payot, Paris, 1988.

[8] C. Crouch (2009), « Privatised keynesianism : an unacknowledged policy regime », British journal of politics and international relations, Vol. 11, 3, 2009, pp. 382-399. Le keynésianisme privé vise à remplacer la dette publique par une dette privée pour élargir les ressources économiques nationales : pour ce faire, l’État permet le développement de l’endettement des ménages (cas typique des crédits immobiliers aux États-Unis). Voir aussi : R. Boyer (2009), « Feu le régime d’accumulation tiré par la finance. La crise des subprimes en perspective historique », Revue de la régulation, Vol. 5, 2009 (http//regulation.revues.org/). Aujourd’hui, le rachat des dettes publiques par la Banque centrale européenne constitue un instrument monétaire similaire que Wolfgang Streeck évoque d’ailleurs dans son ouvrage.

[9] L’auteur qualifie le phénomène d’« hayekization » du capitalisme européen.

[10] R. Boyer, Y. Saillard (dir), Théorie de la régulation. L’état des savoirs, La Découverte, Paris, 2010.

[11] C. Crouch, The Strange non death of neoliberalism, Cambridge, Polity Press, 2011.

[12] M. Blyth, Austerity. The history of a dangerous idea, Oxford, Oxford University Press, 2013.

[13] V. Schmidt, M. Thatcher (eds.), Resilient neoliberalism in Europe’s political economy, Cambridge, Cambridge University Press, 2013.

[14] Les mauvaises langues diront que Wolfgang Streeck réactualise la théorie du capitalisme monopolistique d’État. Voir B. Théret, M. Wieworka, Critique de la théorie du capitalisme monopoliste d’État, Maspero, Paris, 1978.

[15] M. Weber, Histoire économique. Esquisse d’une histoire universelle de l’économie et de la société, Gallimard, Paris, 1991.

[16] B. Jullien, A. Smith (2011), « Conceptualizing the role of politics in the economy: Industries and their institutionalizations », Review of International Political Economy, Vol. 18, 3, pp. 358-383.

[17] Voir, par exemple : P. Hall, K. Thelen, « Institutional change in varieties of capitalism », Socio-economic review, Vol. 7, 2009, pp. 7-34.

Le capitalisme saisi par la politique comparée

Le capitalisme saisi par la politique comparée. Faut-il attendre les organisations partisanes au tournant ?

Antoine ROGER

Lecture critique de : Pablo BERAMENDI, Silja HÄUSERMANN, Herbert KITSCHELT, Hanspeter KRIESI (dir.), The Politics of Advanced Capitalism, Cambridge, Cambridge University Press, 2015

Publiée dans la Revue française de science politique, 66(3-4), 2016, p. 547-551

 

Les coordinateurs de l’ouvrage prétendent se placer dans le sillage deux publications collectives antérieures. Sous la direction de John Goldthorpe, plusieurs auteurs ont, en 1984, tenté de mettre au jour des formes diversifiées de capitalisme et de mesurer l’effet de quelques variables institutionnelles[1]. Quinze ans plus tard, Herbert Kitschelt, Gary Marks et John Stephens ont rassemblé des contributions qui insistaient davantage sur les articulations différenciées entre contraintes internationales et facteurs domestiques[2]. Les auteurs mobilisés se positionnaient alors dans deux registres principaux. Dans un premier registre, Herbert Kitschelt et Hanspeter Kriesi s’efforçaient d’établir des corrélations entre les catégories d’électeurs mobilisables et les programmes économiques des partis politiques. Dans un second registre, les textes de Peter Hall et David Soskice esquissaient une synthèse entre économie institutionnelle et néo-institutionnalisme historique : l’accent y était placé sur les stratégies que développent les firmes pour limiter leurs coûts de transaction, mais aussi sur la stabilisation et l’auto-renforcement des arrangements institutionnels qui en résultent. Cette dernière proposition a rapidement débouché sur la publication d’un nouvel ouvrage collectif[3]. Le titre retenu – Varieties of Capitalism – est devenu le cri de ralliement d’une école qui domine aujourd’hui l’économie politique comparée, à tel point que les initiés se contentent de l’évoquer par le sigle VoC.

Sous couvert de procéder à une actualisation des analyses développées dans les ouvrages de 1984 et 1999, The Politics of Advanced Capitalism ambitionne de redonner une visibilité aux recherches qui portent sur les programmes économiques des partis politiques, en les dotant à leur tour d’une charte scientifique. L’entreprise de rééquilibrage – en forme de revanche éditoriale – est le résultat d’un travail de longue haleine. Plusieurs séminaires préparatoires ont été organisés dans les institutions dont relèvent les coordinateurs de l’ouvrage : l’Institut universitaire européen de Florence (Hanspeter Kriesi), Duke University (Paulo Beramendi, Herbert Kitschelt) et l’Université de Zurich (Silja Häusermann).

L’attachement à se positionner sur le même plan que Peter Hall et David Soskice est perceptible dans la forme même de l’ouvrage, calquées sur celle de l’entreprise éditoriale concurrente : les contributions réunies sont précédées d’une longue introduction programmatique (p. 1-64). Les quatre coordinateurs dénoncent « la focalisation habituelle de la littérature de politique économique sur les grandes entreprises détentrice du capital et le salariat organisé » (p. 27). A leurs yeux, ce face-à-face conditionne de moins en moins l’orientation des politiques économiques : des groupes sociaux qui ne sont relayés par aucune organisation catégorielle peuvent démontrer une forte capacité de mobilisation électorale et peser lourdement sur la définition des politiques économiques ; ils n’affichent pas les mêmes proportions d’un espace national à l’autre et peuvent prêter à des combinaisons diverses (p. 25). Cet argument permet de discuter le schéma de Varieties of capitalism, mais également de récuser les thèses qui lui sont communément opposées. A la différence de Peter Hall et David Soskice, Paulo Beramendi, Silja Häusermann, Herbert Kitschelt et Hanspeter Kriesi refusent d’identifier des modèles nationaux d’organisation économique, conçus comme autant de formes pures, cohérentes et définitives ; ils préconisent plutôt de raisonner en termes de dominantes (autrement dit de retenir des variables continues) et de caractériser des choix de politiques publiques opérés dans des gammes restreintes de possibilités (feasibility sets of policy options) (p. 59-61)[4]. Dans le même temps, leur propos est tourné contre les analyses récentes de Wolfgang Streeck – présenté comme le principal adversaire de Peter Hall et David Soskice[5] – : il n’est pas question selon eux de caractériser une convergence vers une forme unique de capitalisme qui tendrait à soustraire les politiques économiques à tout contrôle démocratique (p. 58).

The Politics of Advanced Capitalism appelle sur cette base à un « tournant électoral » (electoral turn) dans les travaux d’économie politique (p. 4 et 25). Replacés au centre de l’attention, les partis politiques font l’objet d’un traitement théorique très clairement orienté. Dans l’optique retenue, ils ont vocation à élaborer des « stratégies en matière de politiques publiques » (policy strategies). Leurs responsables s’efforcent de formuler une « offre » ajustée à la « demande », autrement dit aux « préférences des citoyens ». Ils doivent néanmoins composer avec les pesanteurs héritées des choix économiques passés. En conséquence, « l’arène électorale est le lieu où les contraintes institutionnelles et structurelles rencontrent les demandes du public » (p. 12). La comparaison doit porter sur les «capacités différentielles des prétendants (incumbents) dans les économies politiques à offrir une réponse adéquate aux changements de la demande en matières de politiques publiques (policy demand) » (p. 3).

Pour préciser la portée de ces propositions, les quatre coordinateurs de l’ouvrage se concentrent sur les « démocraties industrielles avancées ». Rentrent selon eux dans cette catégorie les Etats « démocratiques depuis plus d’une génération », dont le PIB par habitant est supérieur à 25000 dollars en 2011 (selon les données de la Banque mondiale) et dont la population est supérieure à 4 millions d’habitants (p. 4). Lorsque tous les critères sont réunis, une « stabilité institutionnelle » est observée ; le comparatiste peut travailler en toute sérénité dans la mesure où « une expérience cumulative de l’action collective et de l’agrégation des intérêts garantit la constance de nombreuses variables fondamentales » (p. 5)[6].

Les données recueillies permettent de figurer un « espace de l’offre en deux dimensions » (two-dimensional space of supply side). Deux axes paramétriques sont croisés. Le premier oppose les politiques publiques « orientées vers l’investissement » et concentrées sur des objectifs de long terme (éducation, recherche et développement) aux politiques « orientées vers la consommation » et focalisées sur les « retombées économiques directes à court terme ». Le second est tracé entre une « forte intervention de l’Etat » et une priorité donnée à au triptyque « imposition, dépenses publiques, politiques de régulation » d’une part et une « faible intervention de l’Etat » qui laisse place à une « répartition spontanée par le marché » d’autre part. Les politiques économiques menées dans le passé produisent un certain effet de « verrouillage » (lock-in) et limitent la capacité des partis à se déplacer sur chacun des axes ; mais plusieurs options restent dans tous les cas ouvertes (p. 14-15).

En mobilisant les résultats d’ « un nombre important de sondages d’opinion », les auteurs s’efforcent de caractériser sur le même principe un « espace des préférences politiques des citoyens ». Un premier axe permet d’opposer les électeurs attachés à une « intervention de l’Etat » et ceux dont les choix et les projections sont « fondés sur le marché » (market-based) : les premiers recherchent des avantages matériels sûrs et immédiats ; les seconds valorisent la prise de risque et parient sur des gains décuplés dans le futur. En référence à des thèses déjà énoncées par Herbert Kitschelt et Hanspeter Kriesi[7], un second axe sert à distinguer les conceptions « universalistes » et « particularistes » de « l’ordre social »: certains électeurs entendent rester libres de choisir leur mode de vie ; d’autres  estiment porter « un héritage collectif et une tradition qui doivent être respectés, ce qui impose de tracer une frontière nette entre les individus intégrés au groupe et les étrangers » (p. 18). Le croisement orthogonal des axes permet de découper des quadrants et d’y localiser des « électorats ». Les préférences « fondées sur le marché » et « universalistes » sont relevées chez les experts techniques, les professionnels de la finance et les cadres des entreprises privées. Les salariés des entreprises culturelles, des services sociaux et des organisations publiques ou non lucratives associent un attachement à l’« intervention de l’Etat » et un tropisme « universaliste ». Les commerçants et les artisans forment ensemble une « petite bourgeoisie » dont les orientations sont à la fois « fondées sur le marché » et « particularistes ». Les salariés peu qualifiés affectés à des tâches manuelles ou cantonnés à des fonctions d’exécution attendent une « intervention de l’Etat » et affichent une inclination « particulariste » (p. 21-22).

Le schéma permet aux auteurs de conclure à un fractionnement croissant des comportements électoraux et de conclure que le poids des partis dans la conduite des politiques économiques s’en trouve paradoxalement accru : dans la mesure où aucun des groupes identifiés n’offre un réservoir suffisant pour espérer recueillir la majorité des suffrages, les responsables des grandes formations politiques doivent travailler à des « alignements complexes d’intérêts économiques » (p. 25). Ils disposent d’une certaine latitude dans la composition des coalitions (coalitional flexibility) et peuvent s’essayer à des combinaisons multiples. Des renversements d’alliances et des basculements sont toujours envisageables. En tenant compte des contraintes héritées du passé et en mesurant des variations marginales dans la structure globale des « préférences » formulées par les électeurs, il est possible de dresser une typologie dynamique des variétés de capitalisme (p. 29-57).

Les contributions qui suivent sont regroupées en quatre parties. Les premières visent à fournir une cartographie des structures sociales dans les Etats considérés. Elles sont consacrées à l’évolution différenciée des secteurs d’activité (Charles Boix), au poids relatif des contrats de travail et aux formes de sécurité économique qui en résultent (David Rueda, Erik Wibbels, Melina Altamirano), au fractionnement des divisions socio-professionnelles (Daniel Oesch) et à la difficile identification des « clivages de classe » (Rafaela Dancygier et Stefanie Walter) ou encore aux corrélations entre transformation des structures familiales et orientations politiques (Gosta Esping-Andersen). Les textes qui suivent prétendent mesurer des changements généraux dans l’articulation de « l’offre » et de la « demande » politique : les résultats empiriques présentés visent à démontrer l’emprise déclinante des syndicats (Anke Hassel), les reformulations des « préférences » exprimées par les électeurs (Silja Häusermann et Hanspeter Kriesi) et la perturbation des « alignements partisans »  (Herbert Kitschelt et Philipp Rehm). Un troisième ensemble de contributions se concentre sur les choix opérés par les partis politiques en matière de politiques sociales (Evelyn Huber et John Stephens ; Jane Gingrich et Ben Ansell). Dans une quatrième et dernière partie, un retour est opéré sur le schéma exposé en introduction. Il s’agit alors de mesurer l’évolution des arbitrages entre politiques publiques « orientées vers l’investissement » et « orientées vers la consommation » (Pablo Beramendi). La pertinence des thèses défendue est par ailleurs réaffirmée : loin de remettre en cause les « gammes de possibilités » (feasibility sets) mises au jour, la crise financière et les restrictions budgétaires qui en découlent en amplifient la portée (coordinateurs de l’ouvrage). Deux textes sont moins clairement positionné dans l’ensemble: l’un mobilise des enquêtes d’opinion (World value surveys et Eurobaromètres) pour dégager des corrélations entre développement de l’Etat providence et « bien être subjectif »  (Christopher Anderson, Jason Hecht) ; l’autre compare les mesures de libéralisation introduite en Allemagne et au Danemark pour nuancer le schéma de Peter Hall et David Soskice plutôt que pour démontrer la pertinence de propositions alternatives (Gregory Jackson et Kathleen Thelen).

Le postulat retenu par les coordinateurs de l’ouvrage peut prêter à discussion : l’analyse en termes d’alignement et de réalignement des partis sur une « demande » préconstituée ne saurait épuiser la réflexion. Un lecteur qui entend raisonner sur d’autres bases appréciera néanmoins une contribution majeure au débat et saura reconnaître un adversaire de taille. Les choix théoriques opérés sont précis, clairement énoncés et entièrement assumés. Les propositions qui en découlent sont articulées avec élégance. L’ouvrage se distingue en outre par un attachement à remettre sur le métier les principes mêmes de l’économie politique comparée – là ou la plupart des auteurs se contentent d’ajouter quelques variantes au schéma présenté dans Varieties of Capitalism, d’en assouplir les articulations ou d’en dénoncer les faiblesses sans proposer un autre moyen de mettre en rapport des cas diversifiés.

L’entreprise de refondation aurait sans doute été plus efficace encore sans quelques choix de cadrage déroutants. Les critères qui servent à justifier la sélection des cas étudiés sont accolés de façon quelque peu arbitraire et paraissent avoir été posés a posteriori pour donner du crédit à un tri déjà opéré. Ce problème de délimitation empirique a partie liée avec la construction théorique de l’objet : les contours du « capitalisme avancé » sont d’autant plus flous – et les principes de sélection des cas pertinents restent d’autant plus flottants – qu’aucune définition consolidée n’est livrée. Les auteurs utilisent la notion de capitalisme de façon très libre, sinon relâchée, ce qui leur interdit de marquer ensuite avec précision différents niveaux d’intensité. Pas davantage que Peter Hall et David Soskice, ils ne cherchent à caractériser une logique d’accumulation et de dépossession : le texte introductif ignore superbement des questions placées au cœur de nombreux travaux d’économie politique, inscrits dans des traditions intellectuelles diverses. Cette limitation permet de procéder à une sélection des adversaires elle aussi arbitraire. On peut concevoir que la nécessité de se positionner dans un champ de recherche très balisé et d’y marquer un « tournant » impose de construire quelques cibles privilégiées. Le débat n’en paraît pas moins escamoté. Les coordinateurs de l’ouvrage et les contributeurs qui leur emboîtent le pas multiplient les références aux travaux qui portent sur les comportements électoraux et les partis, mais n’intègrent guère les développements récents de l’économie politique comparée ; ils prétendent déclencher une petite révolution sur ce dernier terrain sans considérer les efforts livrés par d’autres bataillons. Aucun intérêt n’est porté aux lectures qualifiées de « critiques » (Bruff ; Ebenau ; Clift)[8], aux propositions qui visent à articuler institutionnalisme et constructivisme[9] (Hay) ou à l’analyse discursive des politiques économiques (Schmidt)[10].

Faute d’engager un dialogue avec ces travaux, les contributeurs de Politics of Advanced Capitalism en arrivent à isoler artificiellement les programmes élaborés par les organisations partisanes et à considérer a priori qu’ils offrent la contribution la plus décisive à la mise en forme des politiques économique. Ils n’envisagent pas que certaines firmes puissent façonner la problématique légitime et fixer les termes mêmes des propositions adressées aux électeurs[11]. Corrélativement, leurs analyses occultent l’activité politique des hauts fonctionnaires : aucun développement n’est consacré aux variations introduites par des structures bureaucratiques différenciées, inscrites dans jeux d’échelles complexes. La faible attention portée aux politiques économiques et monétaires de l’Union européenne ne laisse pas d’étonner. Les coordinateurs de l’ouvrage évoquent bien un « Euroland » (p. 396), mais il l’appréhendent comme un simple espace d’activité et non comme un terrain de lutte. Le rôle politique de la science économique est également passé sous silence[12]. En conséquence, l’ouvrage ignore les relations diversifiées et évolutives entre les chercheurs qui se piquent d’expertise et les responsables des partis politiques[13].

La limitation du périmètre de la réflexion est sans doute imputable au souci de rééquilibrage évoqué en préambule. Au détour d’un paragraphe, le lecteur comprend que les initiateurs du projet ont pour ambition de rallier à leurs vues les chercheurs qui ont jusqu’alors adhéré – peu ou prou – au schéma de Varieties of Capitalism (p. 61). La démarche consiste à leur adresser de nouvelles propositions, sans leur demander de renoncer à une comparaison de cas délimités sur une base strictement nationale ni de tourner le dos à un raisonnement qui concilie choix rationnel et prise en compte des phénomènes de verrouillage institutionnel. Il reste à espérer que l’ouvrage échappera à cet entre-soi intellectuel et qu’il sera discuté dans un cercle plus large.

[1] GOLDTHORPE John H. (dir.) Order and Conflict in Contemporary Capitalism, Oxford, Clarendon Press, 1984

[2] KITSCHELT Herbert, MARKS Gary, STEPHENS John (dir.), Continuity and Change in Contemporary Capitalism, Cambridge University Press, 1999

[3] HALL Peter, SOSKICE David (eds.), Varieties of Capitalism. The institutional foundations of comparative advantage, Oxford, Oxford University Press, 2001

[4] Les arguments opposés à Peter Hall et David Soskice prolongent – sans y faire explicitement référence – les critiques formulées par Colin Crouch : CROUCH, Colin. Capitalist Diversity and Change: Recombinant Governance and Institutional Entrepreneurs, Oxford University Press, 2005, p. 26 et 362

[5] STREECK Wolfgang, Le temps acheté. La crise sans cesse ajournée du capitalisme démocratique, Paris, Gallimard-NRF, 2015 (Traduction de Gekaufte Zeit. Die vertagte Krise des demokratischen Kapitalismus, 2013)

[6] Le périmètre tracé permet de considérer 21 cas  (Allemagne, Australie, Autriche, Belgique, Canada, Danemark, Espagne, Etats-Unis, Finlande, France, Grèce, Irlande, Italie, Japon, Norvège, Nouvelle-Zélande, Pays-Bas, Portugal, Royaume-Uni, Suède, Suisse).

[7] KITSCHELT Herbert, The Transformation of European Social-Democracy, Cambridge, Cambridge University Press, 1994 ; KRIESI Hanspeter, GRANDE Edgar, LACHAT Romain, DOLEZAL, Martin, BORNSCHIER Simon, FREY Timotheus, West European politics in the age of globalization, Cambridge, Cambridge University Press, 2008

[8]BRUFF Ian, EBENAU Matthias, “Critical political economy and the critique of comparative capitalisms scholarship on capitalist diversity”, Capital & Class, vol. 38, no 1, 2014, p. 3-15 ; EBENAU Matthias, BRUFF Ian, MAY Christian, “Introduction: Comparative Capitalisms Research and the Emergence of Critical, Global Perspectives”, in EBENAU Matthias, MAY Christian (dir.), New Directions in Comparative Capitalisms Research: Critical and Global Perspectives, New York, Palgrave MacMillan, 2015; p. 1-8; CLIFT Ben, Comparative Political Economy: States, Markets and Global Capitalism, New York, Palgrave MacMillan, 2014

[9] HAY Colin, “Common trajectories, variable paces, divergent outcomes? Models of European capitalism under conditions of complex economic interdependence”, Review of International Political Economy, vol. 11, no 2, 2004, p. 231-262 ; HAY, Colin, “Two can play at that game… or can they? Varieties of capitalism, varieties of institutionalism”, in COATES David & al. (dir.), Varieties of capitalism, varieties of approaches, New York, Palgrave Macmillan, 2005, 106-121

[10] SCHMIDT Vivien, “Putting the political back into political economy by bringing the state back in yet again”, World Politics, 2009, vol. 61, no 03, p. 516-546

[11] JULLIEN Bernard, SMITH Andy, “Conceptualizing the role of politics in the economy: industries and their institutionalizations”, Review of International Political Economy, vol. 18, no 3, 2011, p. 358-383 ; WALKER Edward, REA Christopher, “The Political Mobilization of Firms and Industries”, Annual Review of Sociology, Vol. 40, 2014, p. 281-304.

[12] FOURCADE-GOURINCHAS Marion, “Politics, Institutional Structures and the Rise of Economics. A Comparative Study”, Theory and Society, 30, 2001, p. 397-447

[13] MUDGE Stephanie, “Explaining Political Tunnel Vision: Politics and Economics in Crisis-Ridden Europe, Then and Now”, European Journal of Sociology, vol. 56, no 1, 2015, p. 63-91

1e journée d’études du groupe SPoC – Programme

Etudier les structures politiques de l’accumulation : approches et concepts

9 février 2018

11h-12h Robert BOYER (UMR PSE), L’héritage de Marx et le capitalisme contemporain

12h-13h Eric LAHILLE (Université Paris-Est, UMR CEMI-EHESS), A la recherche des structures politiques de l’accumulation : pour un programme de recherche institutionnaliste interdisciplinaire.

14h15-15h15 Isaac LAMBERT, Emmanuel LAZEGA (UMR CSO, Science Po Paris), Travail politique et travail judiciaire d’institutionnalisation d’un nouveau régime européen d’accumulation : le cas de la propriété intellectuelle

 15h15-16h15 Yves-David HUGOT (Université Paris Ouest-Nanterre, EA Sophiapol) Les Structures politiques de l’accumulation à l’échelle mondiale et dans la longue durée : « monopoles », « échange inégal » et « système interétatique » chez Immanuel Wallerstein.

16h30-17h30 Céline BESSIERE (Université Paris-Dauphine, UMR IRISSO), Pourquoi les femmes accumulent-elles moins que les hommes ? L’institution familiale comme structure politique

17h30-18h30 Antoine DORE (INRA, UMR Agir), Les infrastructures du biocapitalisme

Discutants

Marie-Laure DJELIC (Sciences Po Paris, UMR CSO)

Andy SMITH (UMR Centre Emile Durkheim, Sciences Po Bordeaux)

1e journée d’études du groupe  SPoC – Argumentaire

Étudier les structures politiques de l’accumulation : approches et concepts

9 février 2018 – Sciences Po Bordeaux

Le capitalisme est un mode d’organisation dans lequel les activités de production et de distribution sont appuyées sur un régime de propriété privée, engagent des rapports monétaires et permettent une accumulation individuelle du capital. Dans les travaux canoniques, l’accumulation est expliquée par une extorsion de la plus-value et une reproduction élargie du capital (Marx, 2006 [1867]) ou mise en rapport avec un règlement des conduites et une organisation méthodique du processus productif (Weber, 2008 [1905] ; 2014 [1921]). L’accent est toujours placé sur la quête incessante du profit : il est possible d’affirmer que le capitaliste – à la différence du thésauriseur – est mu par « le mouvement sans trêve du gain, comme acte de gagner » (Marx, 2006 [1867], 173) ; l’entreprise capitaliste peut aussi être caractérisée par la possession d’un « compte de capital », à la fois produit d’un mouvement général de « rationalisation » et instrument d’un « calcul économique » orienté vers l’accumulation (Weber, 1991 [1923], 295-6)[1]. Le capitalisme implique dans tous les cas une structuration politique – autrement dit un pouvoir inégalement distribué permettant de délimiter les questions et les problèmes légitimes – qui appellent une prise en charge par des politiques publiques. Dans un système capitaliste, les rapports de force politiques ne viennent pas étayer ou guider les activités économiques ; ils les instituent et les structurent intégralement (Palermo, 2007).

Par un coup de force symbolique, l’économie néo-classique a imposé la représentation de deux logiques dissociées : l’argument fondateur est que le marché tend à un équilibre général en l’absence de toute interférence politique. Le questionnement est concentré sur l’économie de marché – autrement dit sur l’appariement d’une offre et d’une demande dans une situation de libre fixation des prix ; les logiques d’accumulation ne sont plus prises en compte. Cette orientation est néanmoins brouillée par des textes normatifs qui continuent de mobiliser le terme « capitalisme » (Friedman 2009 [1962] ; Rand, 1986 [1967]).

Il est permis de considérer que la séparation formelle (et non substantielle) des ordres politique et économique conditionne l’accumulation du capital : le capitalisme se développe précisément dans la mesure où il est perçu comme le produit de logiques économiques autonomes, plus ou moins soutenues ou encadrées par des mesures politiques extérieures (Wood, 1981). La question centrale est alors de mettre au jour, dans des situations historiques particulières, les rapports de force qui contribuent à imposer ce principe de vision et de division. Il s’agit en d’autre terme de caractériser un processus – éminemment politique – de dépolitisation de l’économie.

Les travaux disponibles ne s’engagent guère dans cette voie. Certains visent à rendre compte du capitalisme mais ne placent pas l’accumulation au cœur de leur réflexion ; d’autres se concentrent sur cette dernière question mais ne prennent pas en compte les rapports de force politiques constitutifs du capitalisme. Quelques pistes peuvent être explorées pour remédier à ces difficultés. 

 

Étudier le capitalisme sans considérer l’accumulation ?

Si des sociologues et des politistes ont aujourd’hui recours au terme « capitalisme »[2], leur questionnement ne porte pas directement sur la quête incessante de profit ni sur les mécanismes qui permettent l’accumulation du capital.

Les sociologues des marchés tendent à se concentrer sur les équipements nécessaires au calcul économique (Callon, 2013 ; Callon, Latour, 2017) ou sur la coordination sociale des choix individuels en situation d’incertitude (Nee, Swedberg, 2007). L’objectif est alors d’apporter de nouvelles réponses aux questions posées par l’économie néo-classique – ce qui détourne largement d’un travail sur l’accumulation.

La sociologie de la critique et l’économie des conventions comportent également un angle mort. La perpétuation et les évolutions du capitalisme y sont expliquées par une capacité à absorber les critiques et à développer de nouveaux régimes de justification. Dans cette optique, la « critique artiste » amène à développer un « capitalisme connexionniste » qui met l’accent sur les projets individuels, l’auto-organisation et la capacité à développer des réseaux (Chiapello, Boltanski, 1999). L’éclairage est par ailleurs porté sur les « processus d’enrichissement », autrement dit sur « les opérations dont les choses font l’objet en vue d’en accroître la valeur et d’en augmenter le prix » (Boltanski, Esquerre, 2014, p. 14). Une rupture est marquée avec la théorie classique de la valeur – autrement dit avec le raisonnement qui met l’accent sur la quantité de travail nécessaire à la production d’une marchandise. L’alternative proposée consiste à considérer que la valeur est déterminée au terme d’ajustements et en appui sur des « formes conventionnelles ». Le capitalisme se développe dans la mesure même où il est ouvert à la critique – autrement dit à la contestation des valeurs établies. Il transforme chaque individu en marchand, enjoint à attribuer une valeur (et un prix) à chaque chose (Boltanski, Esquerre, 2017, p. 110). Ce schéma intègre la possibilité que certains tirent avantage des jeux de formes mis au jour et d’autres non, mais il ne permet guère de caractériser des mécanismes d’accumulation.

Les tenants de la sociologie économique néo-institutionnaliste prétendent parfois analyser les fondements du capitalisme, mais ils restent concentrés sur la question de la coopération et de la coordination des acteurs (Fligstein, 1996 ; 2001). Ils cherchent à mettre au jour des « champs d’action stratégique » (strategic action fields) dans lesquels chacun agit en prenant les autres en considération. Tous les acteurs impliqués sont alors supposés participer à un « travail cognitif collaboratif » (collaborative meaning making) qui leur permet de sécuriser leur environnement (Fligstein, McAdam, 2012).  Une fois encore, les processus d’accumulation du capital sont maintenus dans l’ombre.

Les politistes qui se réclament du néo-institutionnalisme historique ne remédient guère au problème. L’ouvrage coordonné par Peter Hall et David Soskice (2001) forme le socle d’un courant de recherches structuré dont le propos consiste à distinguer des « variétés de capitalisme » (Hancké, Rhodes et Thatcher, 2007 ; Hall et Thelen, 2009 ; Jackson et Deeg, 2012). Par-delà quelques nuances, les auteurs qui retiennent cette perspective partagent les mêmes postulats : des interactions spontanées débouchent selon eux sur des solutions d’équilibre qui se transforment rapidement en institutions et qui se consolident au fil du temps. Une logique de « complémentarité institutionnelle » est supposée expliquer cette évolution : le capitalisme se développe lorsque des règles et des normes formées dans différents registres sont entièrement solidaires ; il ne repose pas sur un processus d’accumulation.

 

Étudier l’accumulation sans considérer les rapports de force politiques ?

Parmi les économistes mêmes, des repositionnements sont observés dans le but d’opposer une parade à l’approche néo-classique et de replacer au cœur de l’analyse la question de l’accumulation. Des auteurs post-keynesiens s’illustrent dans ce registre. Mais ils en arrivent eux-mêmes à considérer une logique autonome de production et d’échange : leurs réflexions portent sur les rapports entre taux d’intérêt et taux d’accumulation du capital ; la monnaie, le crédit et l’épargne sont étudiés sans être rapportés à des rapports de force politiques (Kalecki, 1954 ;  Robinson, 1972 [1956] ; Kaldor, 1961).

Les mêmes difficultés peuvent être relevées chez les auteurs qui prétendent retravailler les thèses de Marx en s’écartant des lectures en termes de « capitalisme monopoliste » (Baran, Sweezy, 1970) ou de « capitalisme monopoliste d’Etat » (Collectif, 1971) et en s’inspirant plutôt des réflexions engagées par Rosa Luxemburg. La problématique est alors formulée dans les termes suivants : pour échapper au problème de la sous-consommation, une extension du marché capitaliste est nécessaire ; des classes sociales qui ne sont pas encore engagées dans des relations de production capitalistes doivent être mobilisées ; il s’agit d’y puiser une nouvelle main d’œuvre bon marché, de façon à rémunérer davantage celle qui a été constituée de plus longue date, à lui permettre de consommer les marchandises produites et à amorcer un nouveau cycle d’accumulation (Luxemburg, 1967 [1913], chapitre 27). Immanuel Wallerstein prolonge cette analyse. Il n’est guère pertinent selon lui d’étudier l’accumulation du capital dans des espaces nationaux dissociés. L’appropriation de la plus-value s’opère au bénéfice que quelques « Etats centraux » (core States) et au détriment de périphéries. Les premiers sont fortement dotés en capital (capital intensive), ce qui leur permet de garantir des salaires relativement élevés et de bénéficier de technologies avancées ; les secondes abritent une main d’œuvre abondante et bon marché (labor intensive) (Wallerstein, 1974). Des reformulations ultérieures conduisent à caractériser une « accumulation dépendante » (Frank, Amin, 1978) ou une « accumulation par dépossession » (Harvey, 2010 [2003]). L’éclairage n’est jamais porté sur des luttes politiques qui auraient pour enjeu des principes de vision et de division constitutifs du capitalisme.

Dans un registre différent, des auteurs cherchent à mettre en évidence l’émergence d’un « capitalisme cognitif », défini comme « un système d’accumulation dans lequel la valeur productive du travail immatériel et intellectuel devient prédominante » (Vercellone, 2014, 432). Sur cette base, la valeur d’une marchandise n’est pas indexée à la quantité de travail nécessaire à sa production mais à la somme des connaissances mobilisées par les travailleurs. Ces connaissances ne sont rien d’autre que des « savoirs sociaux » collectivement formés et acquis dans le cadre d’interactions nombreuses, au-delà même des sites de production. Pour entretenir une dynamique d’accumulation, les capitalistes s’attachent à les privatiser – notamment par le dépôt de brevets et par le développement de titres financiers (Vercellone, 2008). En conséquence, le capital déborde la seule sphère de la production et peut être cherché dans toutes les « formes de vie »  (Hardt, Negri, 2004). Si les évolutions décrites présentent bien une dimension politique, il est difficile d’y percevoir des rapports de force nettement structurés et clairement localisés.

 

Étudier les rapports de force politiques constitutifs du capitalisme?

Quelques auteurs prétendent établir un rapport entre les mécanismes d’accumulation du capital et des structures politiques délimitées. Ils ne vont pas jusqu’à considérer que les deux registres sont consubstantiels ; leurs travaux mettent plutôt l’accent sur un encadrement politique de dynamiques économiques autonomes. Dans ses premières formulations, la théorie de la régulation marque ainsi une différence entre une dynamique d’accumulation proprement économique et des mesures politiques externes qui peuvent la soutenir (Aglietta, 1997 [1976] ; Boyer, 1986). La démarche consiste à combiner des variables telles que la distribution du pouvoir (horizontale ou verticale) et le consentement aux mécanismes de redistribution. Les comparaisons effectuées permettent d’observer que l’« activité marchande » est plus ou moins « encastrée dans des institutions politiques » ; des « forces politiques » peuvent ici ou là compenser les effets des « forces économiques » en imposant des règles de solidarité (Boyer et Hollingsworth, 1997, 435-37 ; voir aussi Boyer, 2015). La même orientation peut être relevée dans les recherches menées par les auteurs qui se concentrent sur les « structures sociales de l’accumulation ». L’éclairage est alors porté sur les équilibres institutionnels observés au cours des cycles de croissance : le « processus d’accumulation du capital » est strictement limité aux «  activités génératrices de profit que développent les capitalistes » ; il est simplement canalisé par un « ordre institutionnel » politiquement négocié (Gordon, Weisskopf, Bowles, 1996, p. 228 ; voir aussi Kotz, 1994).

Wolfgang Streeck analyse pour sa part le démantèlement du « capitalisme démocratique » formé dans l’après-guerre et dans le cadre duquel les profits réalisés, soumis à des prélèvements obligatoires, permettaient de financer pour partie des politiques sociales (Streeck, 2015 [2013]). En écho au travail de Thomas Piketty (2013), il met en évidence la forme spécifique que prend l’accumulation à partir des années 1970, lorsqu’une « révolte du capital » est engagée – lorsque les détenteurs des capitaux cherchent en d’autres termes à se soustraire aux contreparties fiscales jusqu’alors imposées. Ces travaux posent des repères utiles, mais ils présentent un caractère macroscopique et ne permettent pas d’apprécier des variations sectorielles. Les rapports de force politiques qui produisent et reproduisent l’accumulation y sont par ailleurs exposés de manière très panoramique. Ils sont envisagés comme la simple expression d’alliances de classes spontanément formées[3]. Les développements récents des sciences sociales du politique ne sont guère pris en considération. Sont notamment ignorées les propositions qui permettent d’appréhender les rapports de force de politiques comme des confits de valeurs arrimés à des systèmes de positions –ou comme des luttes symboliques structurées et structurantes.

 

À la lumière de ces observations, la journée d’études programmée vise à remettre sur le métier la question des structures politiques de l’accumulation. Pour engager une réflexion collective, deux axes sont proposés.

1) Questionner les lectures communes de l’accumulation. Les contributeurs et contributrices sont invités à passer au crible les travaux disponibles et à évaluer la possibilité d’y réintroduire une analyse des rapports de force politiques constitutifs du capitalisme.

2) Développer des lectures alternatives de l’accumulation. Des communications pourront être consacrées au réexamen de notions largement utilisées dans les sciences sociales du politique (instruments, dispositifs, référentiels, arènes/forums, secteurs, champs, etc.), et aux éclairages qu’elles permettent de porter sur les structures politiques de l’accumulation.

 

Références citées

AGLIETTA Michel [1997 (1976)], Régulation et crises du capitalisme. L’expérience des Etats-Unis, Paris, Odile Jacob

AMABLE Bruno (2017), Structural crisis and institutional change in modern capitalism. French capitalism in transition, Oxford, Oxford University Press

AMABLE Bruno, Stefano PALOMBARINI (2017), L’Illusion du bloc bourgeois. Alliances sociales et avenir du modèle français, Paris, Raisons d’agir

BARAN Paul, SWEEZY Paul (1970 [1966]), Le Capitalisme monopoliste: un essai sur la société industrielle américaine, Paris, Maspero

BOLTANSKI Boltanski, CHIAPELLO Eve (1999), Le nouvel esprit du capitalisme, Paris, Gallimard

BOLTANSKI Luc, ESQUERRE Arnaud (2014), « La ‘collection’, une forme neuve du capitalisme. La mise en valeur économique du passé et ses effets »,  Les Temps Modernes, n°679, p. 5-72

BOLTANSKI, Luc et ESQUERRE (2017), Arnaud. Enrichissement. Une critique de la marchandise, Paris, Gallimard

BOYER Robert (2007), “Capitalism strikes back. Why and what consequences for social sciences?”, Revue de la régulation, n° 1

BOYER Robert (2015), Economie politique des capitalismes. Théorie de la regulation et des crises, Paris, La découverte

BOYER Robert (1986), Théorie de la régulation. Une analyse critique, Paris, La Découverte

CALLON Michel (2013), “Qu’est-ce qu’un agencement marchand?” in Michel CALLON (ed.), Sociologie des agencements marchands, Paris, Presse des Mines, p. 325–440

CALLON Michel, LATOUR Bruno (1997), « ‘Tu ne calculeras pas!’ Ou comment symétriser le don et le capital », Revue du MAUSS semestrielle, vol. 9, p. 45-70

Collectif (1971), Le capitalisme monopoliste d’État, traité marxiste d’économie politique, Paris, Editions sociales

CORDONNIER Laurent (2006), Le profit sans l’accumulation: la recette du capitalisme gouverné par la finance. Innovations, n° 1, p. 79-108

FLIGSTEIN Neil (1996), “Markets as politics: a political-cultural approach to market institutions”, American sociological review, 61 (4), p. 656-673

FLIGSTEIN Neil (2001), The Architecture of Markets. An Economic Sociology of Twenty-First-Century Capitalist Societies, Princeton, Princeton University Press

FLIGSTEIN Neil, McADAM Doug (2012), A Theory of Fields, Oxford, Oxford University Press

FRANK André Gunder, AMIN Samir (1978), L’accumulation dépendante, Paris, Anthropos

FRIEDMAN Milton 2009 (1962), Capitalism and freedom, Chicago, University of Chicago Press

GANE Nicholas (2012), Max Weber and contemporary capitalism, Dordrecht, Springer

GORDON David, WEISSKOPF Thomas E., BOWLES Samuel (1996) “Power, Accumulation and Crisis: The Rise and Demise of the Postwar Social Structure of Accumulation,” in LIPPIT Victor D. (ed.), Radical Political Economy: Explorations in Alternative Economic Analysis, Armonk, M.E. Sharpe, p. 226-244

HALL Peter A., SOSKICE David (eds.) (2001), “An Introduction to Varieties of Capitalism”, in HALL Peter, SOSKICE David (ed.), Varieties of capitalism: The institutional foundations of comparative advantage, Oxford, Oxford University Press, 2001, p. 1-71

HALL Peter, THELEN Kathleen (2009), “Institutional change in varieties of capitalism”, Socio-Economic Review, 7(1), p. 7-34

HANCKE Bob, RHODES Martin, THATCHER Mark (eds.) (2007), Beyond Varieties of Capitalism: Conflict, Contradictions, and Complementarities in the European Economy, Oxford, Oxford University Press

HARDT Michael, NEGRI Antonio (2004), Multitude, Paris, La découverte

HARVEY David (2010[2003]), Le nouvel impérialisme, Paris, Les prairies ordinaires

HOLLINGSWORTH J. Rogers, BOYER Robert (1997), Contemporary capitalism: The embeddedness of institutions. Cambridge, Cambridge University Press

JACKSON Gregory, DEEG Richard (2012), “The long-term trajectories of institutional change in European capitalism”, Journal of European public policy, 19(8), p. 1109-1125

KALDOR Nicholas (1961), “Capital accumulation and economic growth”, in LUTZ Friedrich, HAGUE Douglas (eds.), The Theory of Capital, Londres, Macmillan, p. 177-222

KALECKI Michal (1954), Theory of Economic Dynamics, Londres, George Allen

KOTZ David (1994), “Interpreting the Social Structure of Accumulation Theory”, in KOTZ David, McDONOUGH Terrence, REICH Michael (eds.), Social Structures of Accumulation: The Political Economy of Growth and Crisis, Cambridge, Cambridge University Press, p. 50-71.

LAPAVITSAS Costas (2009), “Financialised capitalism: Crisis and financial expropriation”, Historical Materialism, 17(2), p. 114-148

LUXEMBURG Rosa (1967 [1913]), L’Accumulation du capital (Tome 2), Paris, Maspero

MARX Karl (2006 [1867]), Le Capital (Livre 1), Paris, PUF

NEE Victor, SWEDBERG Richard (2007), On Capitalism, Stanford, Stanford University Press

PALERMO Giulio (2007), “The ontology of economic power in capitalism: mainstream economics and Marx”, Cambridge Journal of Economics, 31(4), p. 539-56

PIKETTY Thomas (2013), Le Capital au XXIe siècle, Paris, Seuil

RAND Ayn (1986 [1967]), Capitalism. The Unknown Ideal, Londres, Penguin

ROBINSON Joan (1976[1956]), L’accumulation du capital, Paris, Dunod

STREECK Wolfgang (2010), “E pluribus unum ? Varieties and commonalities of capitalism”, MPIFG discussion papers, 10/12

STREECK Wolfgang (2015 [2013]), Le temps acheté. La crise sans cesse ajournée du capitalisme démocratique, Paris, Gallimard

VERCELLONE Carlo (2008), « La thèse du capitalisme cognitif : une mise en perspective historique et théorique », in COLLETIS Gabriel, PAULRE Bernard. (dir.), Les nouveaux horizons du capitalisme. Pouvoirs, valeurs, temps, Paris, Economica, p. 71-95

VERCELLONE Carlo (2014), “From the Mass-Worker To Cognitive Labour: Historical and Theoretical Considerations”, in VAN DER LINDEN Marcel, ROTH Karl Heinz, HENNINGER Max (eds.), Beyond Marx. Theorising the Global Labour Relations of the Twenty-First Century, Chicago, Haymarket

WALLERSTEIN Immanuel (1974), The modern World-System, Capitalist Agriculture and the Origins of the European World Economy in the Sixteenth Century, New York, Academic Press

WEBER Max (1991 [1923]), Histoire économique. Esquisse d’une histoire universelle de l’économie et de la société, Paris, Gallimard

WEBER Max (2008 [1905]), L’éthique protestante et l’esprit du capitalisme, Paris, Champ-Flammarion

WEBER Max (2014 [1921]), La ville, Paris, La découverte,

WOOD Ellen Meiksins (1981), “The separation of the economic and political in capitalism”, New Left Review, n° 127

[1] Au prix de quelques adaptations, et malgré quelques jugements contraires (Cordonnier, 2006), ces clés de lecture peuvent servir à étudier les développements du capitalisme financier (ou du capitalisme financiarisé) (Lapavitsas, 2009 ; Gane, 2012).

[2] En témoignent les études bibliométriques de Robert Boyer (2007) et de Wolfgang Streeck (2010).

[3] Dans un registre voisin voir : Amable et Palombarini, 2017 ; Amable, 2017.

Structures politiques du capitalisme [SPoC]

Rechercher dans OpenEdition Search

Vous allez être redirigé vers OpenEdition Search